aunt

noun
\ ˈant , ˈänt\

Definition of aunt

1 : the sister of one's father or mother
2 : the wife of one's uncle or aunt

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from aunt

aunthood \ -​ˌhu̇d \ noun
auntlike \ -​ˌlīk \ adjective
auntly adjective

Examples of aunt in a Sentence

He has three aunts and two uncles. This is my Aunt Mary.

Recent Examples on the Web

Another local, an aunt of one of the children involved, shared the events on Twitter. Chloe Foussianes, Town & Country, "Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Shared a Sweet Moment with Blind Children During Their Visit to Birkenhead," 16 Jan. 2019 Kate became an aunt for the first time just last month, after her sister Pippa welcomed a baby boy named Arthur in October. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Kate Middleton Squashes Feud Rumors by Gushing Over Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's Baby," 28 Nov. 2018 Born in New York in 1940, she was raised by her unwed mother and an aunt, immigrant garment-factory workers from Latvia whose relatives were killed in the Holocaust. John Wilkens, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Exhibit curator found her way in the world, now helps others," 8 July 2018 The screening found lung cancer in Ms. DiJulio’s aunt and uncle, who had no symptoms of disease. Amy Dockser Marcus, WSJ, "A Journey With Lung Cancer," 8 Jan. 2019 With characters—aunts and uncles, careless teachers, indifferent construction workers, bosses, girls, and thugs!— people who looked and felt real, if not a little subdued, in their colorations. Tom Chiarella, Popular Mechanics, "Stan Lee Taught Me to Love Storytelling," 13 Nov. 2018 Many of my cousins, aunts and uncles still live in Croatia. Al Saracevic, SFChronicle.com, "In this case, it’s OK to root for a team," 30 June 2018 From their aunts and uncles, Velma and her cousins had heard stories about descent from Monticello’s African-American community. Danielle Jackson, Longreads, "Oral History Project Grounds Story of Monticello in the Lives of the Enslaved," 27 June 2018 From their aunts and uncles, Velma and her cousins had heard stories about descent from Monticello’s African-American community. Andrew M. Davenport, Smithsonian, "Putting Enslaved Families’ Stories Back in the Monticello Narrative," 14 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'aunt.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of aunt

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for aunt

Middle English, from Old French ante, from Latin amita; akin to Old High German amma mother, nurse, Greek amma nurse

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about aunt

Statistics for aunt

Last Updated

13 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for aunt

The first known use of aunt was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for aunt

aunt

noun

English Language Learners Definition of aunt

: the sister of your father or mother or the wife of your uncle

aunt

noun
\ ˈant , ˈänt\

Kids Definition of aunt

1 : a sister of a person's parent
2 : the wife of a person's uncle

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on aunt

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with aunt

Spanish Central: Translation of aunt

Nglish: Translation of aunt for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of aunt for Arabic Speakers

Comments on aunt

What made you want to look up aunt? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

esteemed in general opinion

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

What did you just call me?! A Quiz

  • rows-of-various-emoji
  • If a member of the audience describes your speech as bombastic, does that person mean it is:
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!