assiduous

adjective
as·​sid·​u·​ous | \ ə-ˈsij-wəs How to pronounce assiduous (audio) , -ˈsi-jə- \

Definition of assiduous

: showing great care, attention, and effort : marked by careful unremitting attention or persistent application assiduous planning an assiduous book collector She tended her garden with assiduous attention.

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Other Words from assiduous

assiduously adverb
assiduousness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for assiduous

busy, industrious, diligent, assiduous, sedulous mean actively engaged or occupied. busy chiefly stresses activity as opposed to idleness or leisure. too busy to spend time with the children industrious implies characteristic or habitual devotion to work. industrious employees diligent suggests earnest application to some specific object or pursuit. very diligent in her pursuit of a degree assiduous stresses careful and unremitting application. assiduous practice sedulous implies painstaking and persevering application. a sedulous investigation of the murder

The History of Assiduous

Assiduous came to English directly from the Latin assiduus, an adjective derived from the verb assidēre "to sit beside." To the ancient Romans, assiduus carried meanings ranging from “settled or rooted in place” to “constantly present” to “persistent, unremitting." This last sense was the one borrowed into English four hundred years ago and still used today, often in complimentary phrases such as "an assiduous student" and “assiduous efforts.” In the 18th century, the word took on a mildly pejorative meaning, "obsequious," when used of someone striving to please. This sense has largely passed out of use.

Did You Know?

Judges presiding over assizes (former periodical sessions of the superior courts in English counties) had to be assiduous in assessing how to best address their cases. Not only were their efforts invaluable, but they also served as a fine demonstration of the etymologies of "assiduous," "assess," and "assize." All three of those words derive from the Latin verb assidēre, which is variously translated as "to sit beside," "to take care of," or "to assist in the office of a judge." "Assidēre," in turn, is a composite of the prefix ad- (in this case, meaning "near" or "adjacent to") and sedēre, meaning "to sit."

Examples of assiduous in a Sentence

They were assiduous in their search for all the latest facts and figures. The project required some assiduous planning.
Recent Examples on the Web Curbing Iran’s nuclear aspirations and ambitions for regional dominance will require assiduous American diplomacy, not war. Martin Indyk, WSJ, "The Middle East Isn’t Worth It Anymore," 17 Jan. 2020 Dijlah has been particularly assiduous about reporting on the protests, traveling to provincial capitals and interviewing scores of demonstrators. Falih Hassan, New York Times, "Violence Rises in Iraq’s South Amid Crackdowns on Protests and Press," 28 Nov. 2019 After all the assiduous downplaying of terrorism fears, why are the media up-playing mass-shooting fears? Kyle Smith, National Review, "The Media Should Stop Encouraging Mass-Shooting Phobias," 22 Aug. 2019 Manivel constructs this half-hour segment as as a kind of fly-on-the-wall documentary, emphasizing the warm and productive bond between patient tutor and her assiduous student. Neil Young, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Isadora's Children' ('Les Enfants d'Isadora'): Film Review | Locarno 2019," 22 Aug. 2019 And although the stones used are not actually modified for the task, monkeys are assiduous in searching for and selecting those of the perfect shape. The Economist, "Capuchin monkeys have been using stone tools for around 3,000 years," 27 June 2019 Amiri denim undergoes an even more assiduous process. Alex Bhattacharji, latimes.com, "Mike Amiri, L.A.’s rock ’n’ roll designer, now struts on a global stage," 21 June 2019 The restaurant features a wide-open kitchen surrounded by wooden counters on three sides, where a brigade of assiduous chefs with white caps work in assembly-line fashion. Melinda Joe, Condé Nast Traveler, "34 Best Restaurants in Tokyo," 2 Mar. 2018 Her academic approach to collecting is reinforced by her assiduous inventories of each object’s provenance. Luzanne Otte, Town & Country, "A Day in the Life of Southern Charm's Patricia Altschul," 12 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'assiduous.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of assiduous

circa 1552, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for assiduous

Latin assiduus, from assidēre to sit beside

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Time Traveler for assiduous

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The first known use of assiduous was circa 1552

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Last Updated

20 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Assiduous.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/assiduous. Accessed 26 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for assiduous

assiduous

adjective
as·​sid·​u·​ous | \ ə-ˈsi-jə-wəs How to pronounce assiduous (audio) \

Kids Definition of assiduous

: showing great care, attention, and effort They were assiduous in gathering evidence.

Other Words from assiduous

assiduously adverb

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