ascendant

noun
as·​cen·​dant | \ ə-ˈsen-dənt How to pronounce ascendant (audio) \
variants: or less commonly ascendent

Definition of ascendant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the point of the ecliptic or degree of the zodiac that rises above the eastern horizon at any moment
2 : a state or position of dominant power or importance
3 : a lineal or collateral relative in the ascending line

ascendant

adjective
variants: or less commonly ascendent

Definition of ascendant (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : moving upward : rising
b : directed upward an ascendant stem

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Other Words from ascendant

Adjective

ascendantly adverb

Examples of ascendant in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Harris's North Node of Destiny in Sagittarius falls on his ascendant in Sagittarius, which means that their pairing is fated in the stars. Lisa Stardust, refinery29.com, "An Astrologer Analyzes Joe Biden & Kamala Harris’ Chance Of Winning The Election," 13 Aug. 2020 The ruler of the ascendant is Jupiter, which is located in the first house. Lisa Stardust, refinery29.com, "An Astrologer Analyzes Joe Biden & Kamala Harris’ Chance Of Winning The Election," 13 Aug. 2020 Another good sign: On Election Day, the Moon will be in Gemini, on Harris's ascendant, and on the transiting North Node of Destiny. Lisa Stardust, refinery29.com, "An Astrologer Analyzes Joe Biden & Kamala Harris’ Chance Of Winning The Election," 13 Aug. 2020 There has been a fundamental shift in the way electricity is generated in the United States, with cleaner energy sources such as natural gas, wind and solar power ascendant. New York Times, "A Courtside View of Scott Pruitt’s Cozy Ties With a Billionaire Coal Baron," 2 June 2018 With e-commerce ascendant, nearly everyone else in the retailing, from venerable department stores to once-trendy clothiers like J. Crew, has been struggling to grow or even survive. Chad Bray And Michael J. De La Merced, New York Times, "QVC to Merge With Home Shopping Network in $2.1 Billion Deal," 6 July 2017 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective In a joint statement, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez and Mr. Bowman, both members of the party’s ascendant progressive wing, also cited the latest accusation leveled against the governor. New York Times, "Cuomo Says He Won’t Bow to ‘Cancel Culture’ and Rejects Calls to Resign," 12 Mar. 2021 In addition to serving as Reagan’s first major national platform, then-Texas Gov. George W. Bush was warmly welcomed at the convention during a period that saw neoconservative intellectuals and Christian conservatives as ascendant. Matthew Brown, USA TODAY, "What is CPAC? A brief history of the conservative movement’s most influential gathering," 26 Feb. 2021 The governor portrayed the Republican Party, overall, as ascendant, omitting any mention of his party's failure to retain control of the U.S. Senate. Frank E. Lockwood, Arkansas Online, "Hutchinson faults Trump for GOP schism," 18 Jan. 2021 That view now appears to be ascendant, if not yet the consensus, among the Democrats’ policymaking class. New York Times, "The Biden Team Wants to Transform the Economy. Really.," 11 Feb. 2021 Ten years ago, democracy in the Arab world had seemed ascendant. Joseph Hincks, Time, "She Helped Launch Yemen's Revolution. 10 Years On, Tawakkol Karman Still Believes Change Is Possible," 15 Jan. 2021 Biden flipping Arizona is a sign of Democrats' ascendant influence in the state. Brian Slodysko, Star Tribune, "EXPLAINING RACE CALLS: Presidential race too early to call," 4 Nov. 2020 Biden flipping Arizona is a sign of Democrats' ascendant influence in the state. Arkansas Online, "EXPLAINING RACE CALLS: Presidential race too early to call," 4 Nov. 2020 The Taliban, meanwhile, is emerging from war with the United States battle-hardened and ascendant. Washington Post, "Behind the Taliban’s ties to al-Qaeda: A shared ideology and decades of battlefield support," 8 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ascendant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of ascendant

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1591, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for ascendant

Noun

Middle English ascendent, from Medieval Latin ascendent-, ascendens, from Latin, present participle of ascendere

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Time Traveler for ascendant

Time Traveler

The first known use of ascendant was in the 14th century

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Cite this Entry

“Ascendant.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ascendant. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for ascendant

ascendant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of ascendant

formal
: becoming more popular or successful
: more powerful or important than any other

ascendant

noun
as·​cen·​dant | \ ə-ˈsen-dənt \

Legal Definition of ascendant

More from Merriam-Webster on ascendant

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for ascendant

Nglish: Translation of ascendant for Spanish Speakers

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