arabesque

noun

Definition of arabesque 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an ornament or style that employs flower, foliage, or fruit and sometimes animal and figural outlines to produce an intricate pattern of interlaced lines

2 : a posture (as in ballet) in which the body is bent forward from the hip on one leg with one arm extended forward and the other arm and leg backward

3 : an elaborate or intricate pattern … richly pierced by an arabesque of wormholes.— John Chase an arabesque of vines and leaves

arabesque

adjective
ar·a·besque | \ˌa-rə-ˈbesk, ˌer-ə\

Definition of arabesque (Entry 2 of 2)

: of, relating to, or being in the style of arabesque or an arabesque arabesque frescoes

Illustration of arabesque

Illustration of arabesque

Noun

arabesque 1

In the meaning defined above

Examples of arabesque in a Sentence

Noun

The students practiced their arabesques. She held her arms in arabesque.

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Valdes balanced on one leg for what felt like eons, changing positions from arabesque to passe develope without the use of her partner, Patricio Reve. Lauren Warnecke, chicagotribune.com, "Ballet Nacional de Cuba's 'Don Quixote' is unapologetically unrefreshed — and the dancing is glorious," 19 May 2018 DeWitt’s story is a deliciously light arabesque around the most popular and prestigious of these concepts, the Death of the Author—a figurative phrase used by Roland Barthes and others to describe an ideal authorial withdrawal from a literary text. James Wood, The New Yorker, "Helen DeWitt Has Your Number," 27 Oct. 2017 The finished volume is a funky panoply of arabesques, polygons and polyhedra, a fantasy of spikes, spines and spires, left levitating in white space or emerging spectrally from backgrounds dark as night. Christoph Irmscher, WSJ, "‘The Art and Science of Ernst Haeckel’ Review: The Zoologist as Artist," 13 Apr. 2018 The double barrel vault ceiling has stenciled sea shells and arabesques. Janet Eastman, OregonLive.com, "Portland price breaker: Storied mansion sells for $7 million (photos)," 19 Feb. 2018 Anyone who's struggled through a balance sequence in yoga will be seriously impressed by Dobrev's next feat: lifting her foot up and behind her head into an arabesque. Leah Prinzivalli, SELF, "We Asked 2 Kids to Test Nina Dobrev's Flexibility and We're Seriously Impressed," 10 Jan. 2018 The 260 rooms are filled with curves: rounded frames for the desks and bed platforms, arabesques on walls and curtains, and circular chairs positioned to take in the seafront or the evolving skyline of starchitect skyscrapers. Condé Nast Traveler, "W Doha," 20 Oct. 2017 That being said, Act 2 presents many tests for the corps, most notably the famous crisscrossing of lines while holding a perfect arabesque. Lauren Warnecke, chicagotribune.com, "Joffrey Ballet sets aside its modern lines and embraces 'Giselle'," 19 Oct. 2017 Achieving this joie de vivre is something Bowers explores in her new book, Ballet for Life (Rizzoli), which spans, like a graceful arabesque, beyond her fitness regimen and into general well-being. Lilah Ramzi, Vogue, "In the Kitchen With Ballet Beautiful’s Mary Helen Bowers," 17 Oct. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Many visitors admire the arabesque architecture (detailed on page 78) but fewer realize the city’s real triumph: the plumbing dates back to the second century and effortlessly carries the waste away. Rebecca Hazelton, New Republic, "IN THE CITY OF DESIRE," 18 Jan. 2018 The first move, the arabesque sous sous, gives a simple plank an upgrade. Health Staff, PEOPLE.com, "Tracy Anderson’s Top 5 Belly Fat-Blasting Exercises," 2 Nov. 2017 An at-home-after-a-long-day impromptu dance party in May, Arabella in arabesque pose inside the White House China Room, with a caption from Ivanka about being ready for the weekend in June. Kate Bennett, CNN, "Ivanka Trump rebrands -- again," 4 Oct. 2017 Chew-Bose’s arabesque prose is sometimes lyrical to a fault. Ismail Muhammad, Slate Magazine, "Durga Chew-Bose’s dense, meticulous writing on identity politics feels like a corrective for our current political moment.," 14 Apr. 2017 When Ms. Bromberg held a single arabesque line that was revolved twice by Mr. Swatosh, wasn’t her arm stretching too high? Alastair Macaulay, New York Times, "Review: Miami City Ballet, a Troupe at Home Outside Its Turf," 14 Apr. 2016 The jeweler was born too late to woo Bardot with his oversize arabesque hoops, but Jordan’s Queen Rania, Jessica Alba, and Gigi Hadid are fans. Vogue, "A Guide to Brigitte Bardot’s Beirut," 14 July 2017 Grandmother’s table has at least seven: a chamfered-corner marble top, palmette edge, carved arabesque apron, winged maiden supports, finial topped X-stretcher and paw feet. Jane Alexiadis, The Mercury News, "What’s It Worth?: 19th-century Renaissance revival table," 9 Mar. 2017 This is no surprise since the brand’s creative director, Clare Waight Keller, is fascinated with arabesque architecture. Jenn Tanaka, Orange County Register, "Architects of Style," 3 Mar. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'arabesque.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of arabesque

Noun

circa 1720, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

circa 1656, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for arabesque

Noun

see arabesque entry 2

Adjective

French, from Italian arabesco Arabian in fashion, from arabo Arab, from Latin Arabus

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Dictionary Entries near arabesque

Arab

araba

Arabella

arabesque

arabesque spin

Arabia

Arabian

Statistics for arabesque

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Time Traveler for arabesque

The first known use of arabesque was circa 1656

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More Definitions for arabesque

arabesque

noun

English Language Learners Definition of arabesque

: a complicated decorative design made with many lines that curve and cross each other

: a ballet position in which the dancer stands on one foot and holds one arm forward while the other arm and leg are held out behind

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