aperture

noun

ap·​er·​ture ˈa-pər-ˌchu̇r How to pronounce aperture (audio)
ˈa-pə-,
-chər,
-ˌtyu̇r,
-ˌtu̇r
1
: an opening or open space : hole
entered the cave through a narrow aperture
2
a
: the opening in a photographic lens that admits the light
b
: the diameter of the stop in an optical system that determines the diameter of the bundle of rays traversing the instrument
c
: the diameter of the objective lens or mirror of a telescope

Examples of aperture in a Sentence

We entered the cave through a narrow aperture. The photograph was taken using a fast shutter speed and a large aperture.
Recent Examples on the Web To calculate the correct power for a scene, divide the Guide Number by the aperture value. PCMAG, 11 Apr. 2024 So the split between the United States and Israel that is obvious over Rafah in the moment, imminent over Lebanon for the spring and summer, and seemingly irreconcilable over annexation versus Palestinian independence in the long term becomes all the more cavernous as the aperture widens. Hussein Ibish, The Atlantic, 5 Apr. 2024 The Harlem Renaissance reshaped the landscape of American culture, and for Black artists around the globe the aperture of what was possible widened. Invite your friends. Veronica Chambers, New York Times, 5 Apr. 2024 So, there are those who can afford care or use long-term care insurance, there are those dependent on the government, and then there is the aperture—people who don’t qualify for assistance and don’t have the finances to pay for help. Peter Ross, Forbes, 28 Mar. 2024 At the very least, the iPhone 15 Pro’s primary camera has a wider aperture than the iPhone 14 Pro. Florence Ion / Gizmodo, Quartz, 9 Mar. 2024 When conditions are right, synthetic aperture sonar is capable of ultra high-resolution imagery similar to this unidentified shipwreck off Nantucket, Massachusetts. USA TODAY, 29 Mar. 2024 Narrowing the aperture, among large retailers with revenues of more than $500 million, the adoption of AI stretches to 64%. Steve McDowell, Forbes, 27 Mar. 2024 In a twist, the ball-like structure can also be rotated slightly by hand to change the aperture of light, turning a lantern into a kaleidoscope. New York Times, 24 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'aperture.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, borrowed from Latin apertūra, from apertus, past participle of aperīre "to open" + -ūra -ure — more at aperient

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of aperture was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near aperture

Cite this Entry

“Aperture.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aperture. Accessed 21 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

aperture

noun
ap·​er·​ture ˈap-ə(r)-ˌchu̇(ə)r How to pronounce aperture (audio)
-chər
1
: an opening or open space : hole
2
a
: the opening in a camera lens that allows light through
b
: the diameter of the opening in a camera lens

Medical Definition

aperture

noun
1
: an opening or open space
2
: the diameter of the stop in an optical system that determines the diameter of the bundle of rays traversing the instrument

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