orifice

noun

or·​i·​fice ˈȯr-ə-fəs How to pronounce orifice (audio)
ˈär-
: an opening (such as a vent, mouth, or hole) through which something may pass
an anatomical orifice
the nozzle orifice
the cone built up from the cinders around the eruption orificeR. H. Mohlenbrock
orificial adjective

Examples of orifice in a Sentence

the mouth is a bodily orifice
Recent Examples on the Web In December 2022, a blogger on Defector listed some of the specific foreign objects found in the CPSC database, classified by orifice. Melissa Rudy, Fox News, 5 Nov. 2023 Knives and carcasses and dark orifices exist in otherworldly spaces. E. Tammy Kim, The New Yorker, 14 July 2023 This is the kind of movie where, at any moment, the editor might throw in an insert shot of an oozing orifice, keeping viewers on their toes. Noel Murray, Los Angeles Times, 1 Sep. 2023 Another unique anatomical feature is that during these females’ juvenile stage, the vaginal orifice remains closed. Alejandra Manjarrez, Discover Magazine, 28 July 2023 Blood is everywhere — penetrating the walls of an elevator and dripping from various orifices. Lovia Gyarkye, The Hollywood Reporter, 17 Mar. 2023 Surgeries included many performed in the body’s orifices to treat polyps, inflamed tonsils, hemorrhoids and fistulas. Franz Lidz, New York Times, 13 June 2023 The twisted nightmares of bioengineering, with hideous orifices and unnatural urges, are bad; normal is good. Noah Berlatsky, Los Angeles Times, 11 Apr. 2023 Marburg causes high fever, vomiting, diarrhea and, in the most severe cases, bleeding from orifices. Stephanie Nolen, New York Times, 3 Apr. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'orifice.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Middle French & Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin orificium, from Latin or-, os mouth + facere to make, do — more at oral, do

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of orifice was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near orifice

Cite this Entry

“Orifice.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/orifice. Accessed 4 Dec. 2023.

Kids Definition

orifice

noun
or·​i·​fice ˈȯr-ə-fəs How to pronounce orifice (audio)
ˈär-
: an opening (as a mouth or hole) through which something may pass

Medical Definition

orifice

noun
or·​i·​fice ˈȯr-ə-fəs, ˈär- How to pronounce orifice (audio)
: an opening through which something may pass
orificial adjective

More from Merriam-Webster on orifice

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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