crevice

noun
crev·​ice | \ ˈkre-vəs How to pronounce crevice (audio) \

Definition of crevice

: a narrow opening resulting from a split or crack (as in a cliff) : fissure A lizard emerged from a crevice in the cliff …— Tony Hillerman

What's the difference between a crevice and a crevasse?

Crevice and crevasse are very similar words: both come from Old French crever "to break or burst" and both refer to an opening of some kind. In fact, you can say that the only notable distinction between the two is the size of the openings they denote—and that one of them—crevice—is far more common than the other.

A crevice is a narrow opening resulting from a split or crack. In nature, crevices exist mostly in rocks and cliffs, but writers sometimes use the word for similar openings found in other materials, as in "crumbs in the crevices of the cushion." The word also is used metaphorically, as in "the cracks and crevices of memory."

Crevasse refers to a deep hole or fissure in a glacier or in the earth. In most instances, the word appears with enough context that the depth of the opening is easy enough to figure out, as in "a climber who fell 30 feet into a crevasse."

You'll sometimes find crevice used where crevasse is expected—probably because it's the word people are more familiar with. One way to remember the distinction between crevice and crevasse is that the i in crevice, the smaller hole, is a thinner letter than a in crevasse, the larger hole. Or, should you step into a crevasse, perhaps you'll have time for a lot of "Ahhhs"?

Examples of crevice in a Sentence

steam escaped from a long crevice in the volcano
Recent Examples on the Web Having examined the heart’s every crevice, having exposed every weakness, every selfish or shameful desire, and still insisting that love conquers all, there’s nothing left for Mozart to do but light the fireworks. Matthew Aucoin, The Atlantic, 23 Nov. 2021 And for more targeted above-floor cleaning, the vacuum comes with two attachments: a crevice tool and a pet-multi tool. Isabel Garcia, PEOPLE.com, 14 Dec. 2021 There’s a Laser Slim Fluffy head for hard floors, a High Torque cleaner head for all kinds of floors, a crevice tool, dirt brush, and more. Christian De Looper, BGR, 22 Nov. 2021 Plus the vacuum also doubles as a handheld appliance, complete with several accessories that can be attached to the base, including a brush tool, crevice tool, and retractable tool. Amy Schulman, PEOPLE.com, 11 Dec. 2021 There’s a Laser Slim Fluffy head for hard floors, a High Torque cleaner head for all kinds of floors, a crevice tool, dirt brush, and more. Christian De Looper, BGR, 22 Nov. 2021 At times, this sensuous lyricism even spills over into outright dreaminess, as the gutter of a book turns into the crevice between warm thighs or when Ahmed imagines a stylus drawing ink across his body, and eventually drawing blood from a wound. Jessica Kiang, Variety, 7 Nov. 2021 There’s a Laser Slim Fluffy head for hard floors, a High Torque cleaner head for all kinds of floors, a crevice tool, dirt brush, and more. Christian De Looper, BGR, 22 Nov. 2021 The harrowing tale began last Thursday, Oct. 7, when the hiker's dog became trapped in a rocky crevice near Gertrude’s Nose Trail in Minnewaska State Park Preserve in Ulster County, according to the state Parks Department. Joseph Spector, USA TODAY, 14 Oct. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'crevice.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of crevice

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for crevice

Middle English, from Anglo-French crevace, from crever to break, from Latin crepare to crack

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Time Traveler for crevice

Time Traveler

The first known use of crevice was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near crevice

crevette

crevice

creviced

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Statistics for crevice

Last Updated

3 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Crevice.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/crevice. Accessed 18 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for crevice

crevice

noun

English Language Learners Definition of crevice

: a narrow opening or crack in a hard surface and especially in rock

crevice

noun
crev·​ice | \ ˈkre-vəs How to pronounce crevice (audio) \

Kids Definition of crevice

: a narrow opening (as in the earth) caused by cracking or splitting : fissure

crevice

noun
crev·​ice | \ ˈkrev-əs How to pronounce crevice (audio) \

Medical Definition of crevice

: a narrow fissure or cleft an ulcerated periodontal crevice — see gingival crevice

More from Merriam-Webster on crevice

Nglish: Translation of crevice for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of crevice for Arabic Speakers

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