angle

noun (1)
an·​gle | \ ˈaŋ-gəl How to pronounce angle (audio) \

Definition of angle

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1 : a corner whether constituting a projecting part or a partially enclosed space They sheltered in an angle of the building.
2a : the figure formed by two lines extending from the same point also : dihedral angle
b : a measure of an angle or of the amount of turning necessary to bring one line or plane into coincidence with or parallel to another
3a : the direction from which someone or something is approached soldiers being attacked from every angle a football player trying to get an angle on an opponent [=approach an opponent from an effective angle]
b : the precise viewpoint from which something is observed or considered a camera angle consider the question from all angles also : the aspect seen from such an angle discuss all angles of the question
c(1) : a special approach, point of attack, or technique for accomplishing an objective try a new angle
(2) : an often improper or illicit method of obtaining advantage a salesman always looking for an angle
4 : a sharply divergent course The road went off at an angle.

angle

verb (1)
angled; angling\ ˈaŋ-​g(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce angle (audio) \

Definition of angle (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

: to turn or proceed at an angle The road angles up the hill.

transitive verb

1 : to turn, move, or direct at an angle slipped the key in and angled it to one side
2 : to present (something, such as a news story) from a particular or prejudiced point of view : slant angled stories toward the newspaper's political preferences

angle

verb (2)
angled; angling

Definition of angle (Entry 3 of 4)

intransitive verb

1 : to fish with a hook
2 : to use artful means to attain an objective angled for an invitation

Angle

noun (2)
An·​gle | \ ˈaŋ-gəl How to pronounce Angle (audio) \

Definition of Angle (Entry 4 of 4)

: a member of a Germanic people that invaded England along with the Saxons and Jutes in the fifth century a.d. and merged with them to form the Anglo-Saxon peoples

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Other Words from angle

Noun (1)

angled \ ˈaŋ-​gəld How to pronounce Angle (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for angle

Synonyms: Noun (1)

Synonyms: Verb (1)

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Examples of angle in a Sentence

Noun (1) The lines are at sharp angles to each other. Critics love the clever camera angles the director used in the film. She took pictures of the same scene from several different angles. The soldiers were being attacked from every angle. We need to approach the problem from a new angle. They considered the question from all angles. The reporter tried to work that angle into his story.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun David Culley's second press conference as head coach of the Houston Texans on Thursday was a cat-and-mouse game as the media hit him with questions about Deshaun Watson from every angle and Culley batted them back with almost the same answer. Matt Young, Chron, "David Culley: 'Deshaun Watson is a Houston Texan and we're committed to him'," 11 Mar. 2021 Research has proved that home runs are the most efficient way to score runs, and teams have understandably focused on exploiting their increasing knowledge of how to produce them, of launch angle and exit velocity. Phil Miller, Star Tribune, "Twins offense has had a very hit-or-miss approach," 13 Feb. 2021 With this device the best flight profiles are worked out ahead of time, including the angle of climb-out and its length of time, the most efficient altitude at which to boost to supersonic speed and how to handle emergency situations. Thomas E. Stimson, Popular Mechanics, "Remembering the B-70: The Weird Supersonic Bomber That Never Was," 11 Feb. 2021 Huanuo’s ergonomic foot rest has three height positions, a 30-degree tilt angle and a non-skid textured surface ($25.99). oregonlive, "Easily upgrade your home desk: Get organized, comfortable in 2021," 12 Jan. 2021 That dynamic sets up two more: first, says Karl Birkeland, the director of the Forest Service’s National Avalanche Center, many of the low-angle and more predictable slopes closer to trailheads are getting crowded and tracked up. Marc Peruzzi, Outside Online, "Last Weekend Was a Deadly One in the Rockies," 24 Dec. 2020 The angle and shape of follicles also contributes to another distinguishing characteristic of hair: how each strand is structured. Amber Rambharose, Allure, "The Science of Beauty: How to Take Care of Curly Hair," 10 Dec. 2020 Featuring two 3000° Kelvin floodlights, the Ring Floodlight cam projects 1,800 Lumens across a wide viewing angle to spook intruders and capture HD video in the harsh light of a soft white glow. Popsci Commerce Team, Popular Science, "Best home security cameras: Our picks to help keep you (and your stuff) safe," 16 Mar. 2021 The loading pin forms a slight incline angle, allowing gravity to help. Chris Hachey, BGR, "Best Weight Storage Rack," 16 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb When cleaning or disinfecting, make sure to angle the steamer away from you. Hanna Horvath, NBC News, "6 best clothes steamers and garment steamers of 2021," 25 Mar. 2021 When going uphill, a skier may angle the tips of the skis outward and use a herringbone technique. Kyle Schurman, chicagotribune.com, "What is cross-country skiing?," 26 Feb. 2021 Without being obsessive, think about your on-screen appearance, makeup, lighting, camera height and angle and backdrop. New York Times, "How to Hold a Virtual Memorial Service," 14 Jan. 2021 On long-term camera sets like this, angle your lenses north or south when possible to avoid flares that can trigger the camera and wash out images at the best times of day. Will Brantley, Field & Stream, "Our 21 Favorite Trail Camera Photos," 10 Dec. 2020 The solution was to angle one wall so that the house tapers like the site. Kim Palmer, Star Tribune, "They found an empty lot facing the Mississippi River and built a modern dream home," 4 Dec. 2020 The Civic is perhaps the only car of this size in which the driver doesn't have to angle his feet toward the center of the car to avoid the left front wheel housing. Car and Driver, "1973 Honda Civic," 18 Nov. 2020 Cephus appeared to angle his route toward the sideline some 30 yards downfield, near the Lions’ 35-yard line, but should have adjusted to a go route on the play. Dave Birkett, Detroit Free Press, "Detroit Lions film review: Inside Matthew Stafford's game-winning drive vs. Washington," 17 Nov. 2020 When setting up the sticks, angle them back toward you a bit so that the rifle wants to naturally fall into your shoulder. John B. Snow, Outdoor Life, "Shooting Sticks Can Help You Get a Shot on Game When Nothing Else Will," 28 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The apartments include a bathroom, kitchenette, closets and space for a bed and other furniture, and windows angle toward the skyline rather than the imposing and ugly Hall of Justice. Heather Knight, San Francisco Chronicle, "S.F. finds a way to build homeless housing cheaper and faster. A powerful opponent is fighting it," 20 Mar. 2021 Cleveland businessman Bernie Moreno’s likely bid for the U.S. Senate has the backing of a key Trump adviser, as multiple potential candidates angle for the former president’s support. Cliff Pinckard, cleveland, "Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish doubles down on sheriff dispute: The Wake Up for Thursday, March 4, 2021," 4 Mar. 2021 When going uphill, a skier may angle the tips of the skis outward and use a herringbone technique. Kyle Schurman, chicagotribune.com, "What is cross-country skiing?," 26 Feb. 2021 Without being obsessive, think about your on-screen appearance, makeup, lighting, camera height and angle and backdrop. New York Times, "How to Hold a Virtual Memorial Service," 14 Jan. 2021 On long-term camera sets like this, angle your lenses north or south when possible to avoid flares that can trigger the camera and wash out images at the best times of day. Will Brantley, Field & Stream, "Our 21 Favorite Trail Camera Photos," 10 Dec. 2020 The solution was to angle one wall so that the house tapers like the site. Kim Palmer, Star Tribune, "They found an empty lot facing the Mississippi River and built a modern dream home," 4 Dec. 2020 The Civic is perhaps the only car of this size in which the driver doesn't have to angle his feet toward the center of the car to avoid the left front wheel housing. Car and Driver, "1973 Honda Civic," 18 Nov. 2020 Cephus appeared to angle his route toward the sideline some 30 yards downfield, near the Lions’ 35-yard line, but should have adjusted to a go route on the play. Dave Birkett, Detroit Free Press, "Detroit Lions film review: Inside Matthew Stafford's game-winning drive vs. Washington," 17 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'angle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of angle

Noun (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Verb (2)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for angle

Noun (1)

Middle English, "corner, recess, two lines extending from the same point," borrowed from Anglo-French angle, aungle, going back to Latin angulus "two lines extending from the same point, corner, nook," going back to Indo-European *h2eng-lo-, *h2eng-elo-, whence also Old Church Slavic ǫgŭlŭ "corner, angle," Russian úgol, genitive uglá, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian ȕgao, ȕgla, Armenian ankiwn, and perhaps Germanic *ankula-, *ankila- ankle

Verb (1)

Middle English anglen "to meet at an angle," derivative of angle angle entry 1

Verb (2)

Middle English anglen, derivative of angel "fishhook," going back to Old English angel, ongel, going back to Germanic *angula- "hook, barb" (whence also Old Saxon angul "fishhook," Old High German, "hook, barb," Old Norse ǫngull "fishhook"), going back to Indo-European *h2enk-ul-ó-, derivative, perhaps diminutive, of a base *h2enk- seen also in the n-stem noun *h2enk-ón- (whence Old English anga "prick, goad," Old High German ango "sting, barb, door hinge," Greek ankṓn "bend, elbow"), suffixed in Greek ankýlos "bent, crooked, curved," and as an o-grade derivative in Greek ónkos "barb of an arrow," Latin uncus "curved at the extremities, hooked, a hook," and probably Sanskrit aṅkáḥ "curve, hook"; *h2enk- perhaps attested as a primary verb in Sanskrit áñcati, ácati "(it) bends, curves"

Note: Indo-European *h2enk- appears to be synonymous with the base *h2eng- —see angle entry 1, ankle.

Noun (2)

Latin Angli, plural, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English Engle Angles

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Time Traveler for angle

Time Traveler

The first known use of angle was in the 14th century

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Statistics for angle

Last Updated

1 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Angle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/angle. Accessed 11 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for angle

angle

noun

English Language Learners Definition of angle

: the difference between the direction of two lines or surfaces that come together : the space or shape formed when two lines or surfaces meet each other
used to describe a surface that is not level
used to describe something that leans or goes to the side rather than straight up or directly forward

angle

noun
an·​gle | \ ˈaŋ-gəl How to pronounce angle (audio) \

Kids Definition of angle

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : the figure formed by two lines meeting at a point
2 : point of view Let's consider the problem from a new angle.
3 : a sharp corner They stood in an angle of the building.
4 : the slanting direction in which something is positioned The road goes off on an angle.

angle

verb
angled; angling

Kids Definition of angle (Entry 2 of 3)

: to turn, move, or point in a direction that is not straight or flat The spotlight was angled down toward the floor.

angle

verb
angled; angling

Kids Definition of angle (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : to fish with hook and line
2 : to try to get something in a sly way He's always angling for a compliment.

angle

noun
an·​gle | \ ˈaŋ-gəl How to pronounce angle (audio) \

Medical Definition of angle

1 : a corner whether constituting a projecting part or a partially enclosed space
2a : the figure formed by two lines extending from the same point
b : a measure of an angle or of the amount of turning necessary to bring one line or plane into coincidence with or parallel to another

Other Words from angle

angled \ -​gəld How to pronounce angle (audio) \ adjective

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Comments on angle

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