aloof

adjective
\ ə-ˈlüf How to pronounce aloof (audio) \

Definition of aloof

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: removed or distant either physically or emotionally an aloof, unfriendly manner He stood aloof from worldly success.— John Buchan

aloof

adverb

Definition of aloof (Entry 2 of 2)

: at a distance trying to keep failure aloof

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Other Words from aloof

Adjective

aloofly adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for aloof

Adjective

indifferent, unconcerned, incurious, aloof, detached, disinterested mean not showing or feeling interest. indifferent implies neutrality of attitude from lack of inclination, preference, or prejudice. indifferent to the dictates of fashion unconcerned suggests a lack of sensitivity or regard for others' needs or troubles. unconcerned about the homeless incurious implies an inability to take a normal interest due to dullness of mind or to self-centeredness. incurious about the world aloof suggests a cool reserve arising from a sense of superiority or disdain for inferiors or from shyness. aloof from his coworkers detached implies an objective attitude achieved through absence of prejudice or selfishness. observed family gatherings with detached amusement disinterested implies a circumstantial freedom from concern for personal or especially financial advantage that enables one to judge or advise without bias. judged by a panel of disinterested observers

Can you be loof instead of aloof?

The English language has a large number of words that contain a negative prefix, and for the most part these will leave us with an easy way to understand these words if we take their prefixes away. Disinclined is "the state or condition of not being inclined to do something," unaware means "not being aware," and amoral refers to not being moral. Every so often, however, we come across specimens which appear somewhat odd if we take away the prefix; if disgruntled means “discontented” then does gruntle mean “to make content”? And if aloof means “emotionally or physically distant” then must loof mean “emotionally or physically close”?

It’s a bit complicated. In the case of gruntle, the word does indeed mean “to put in a good humor,” but only because people began using it in this fashion in the early 20th century as a jocular back-formation from disgruntle. Gruntle had an earlier sense, which was “grumble,” and the dis- in disgruntle was an intensifying prefix rather than a negative one. In the case of aloof the a- is a negative prefix, but loof did not mean “close.” This word is a variant of luff, which referred to the side of a ship, and the earliest sense of aloof was “to windward.” Soon after the word entered English it began to be used to mean “at a distance,” and soon after that took on the meaning of “physically or emotionally removed.”

Examples of aloof in a Sentence

Adjective In truth, he isn't so much aloof as he is courtly in a formal, afternoon-tea sort of way. — Joe Klein, Time, 21 July 2003 Most American journalists who "do" politics cannot resist getting to know the Players. Walter Lippmann was typical of an earlier generation, the disinterested wise man who remained aloof, chiselling great thoughts on marble columns. — Gore Vidal, Nation, 12 June 1995 Jeremy Price (this name and a few others have been changed), a black teacher from St. Paul's, tried a few times to make small talk, but he was a Brahmin from another planet: cool, ironic, aloof. — Lorene Cary, Black Ice, 1991 Somehow, I remember the fireworks man as solitary, aloof, coveralled, perhaps sooty, staring straight ahead as he came, perhaps reflecting back on the trench-war violence he had just been a part of … — George Plimpton, Fireworks, 1984 They tried to keep aloof from the politics of the day. the new kid was really not so aloof as we thought him at first, just painfully shy
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Peter is aloof and could not be less concerned, which is the very thing that infuriates Chad about him. Derek Lawrence, EW.com, "Nasim Pedrad on how and why she's playing a 14-year-old boy in Chad," 1 Apr. 2021 Stanley — as the mom, Mary Jane — is the spine of the musical, trying to connect with her workaholic husband and aloof teenage kids. Mark Kennedy, Star Tribune, "Tonywatch: Elizabeth Stanley seeks 'healing and connection'," 3 Mar. 2021 He gets attacked for acting like an actual human being with down-to-earth flaws, and for acting like an aloof alien whose sole interests are in the stars. Nicholas Clairmont, Washington Examiner, "Artful dodger," 11 Feb. 2021 Two weeks ago, coach Matt Nagy remained evasive and aloof when asked for an update on Whitehair’s health and status. Dan Wiederer, chicagotribune.com, "Cody Whitehair remains vague about his COVID-19 experience but is happy to be back with the Chicago Bears," 25 Nov. 2020 Devoid of people, the Hammer’s conventional, white-cube galleries seem rather airless and aloof. Los Angeles Times, "Review: Extreme alienation reigns in the Hammer Museum’s (unopened) biennial," 10 Nov. 2020 The man, meanwhile, is somehow both wicked and aloof. Lauren Michele Jackson, The New Yorker, "The Racial Politics of Kamala Harris’s Performance Style," 17 Oct. 2020 Venus enters Aquarius on February 1, giving us all a cool and aloof attachment to romance and finances. Lisa Stardust, refinery29.com, "Your February Horoscope Is Here," 1 Feb. 2021 Neutrinos are famously aloof particles, and questions remained over exactly how neutrinos transfer their energy to the star’s ordinary matter under the extreme conditions of a collapsing star. Quanta Magazine, "Secret Ingredient Found to Power Supernovas," 21 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'aloof.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of aloof

Adjective

1608, in the meaning defined above

Adverb

1523, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for aloof

Adjective

derivative of aloof entry 2

Adverb

from earlier aloof "(on a ship) to windward, toward the direction from which the wind is blowing (hence avoiding the lee shore)," from a- entry 1 + loof, variant of luff entry 1

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Statistics for aloof

Last Updated

8 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Aloof.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aloof. Accessed 17 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for aloof

aloof

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of aloof

: not involved with or friendly toward other people
: not involved in or influenced by something

aloof

adverb
\ ə-ˈlüf How to pronounce aloof (audio) \

Kids Definition of aloof

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: at a distance stood aloof

aloof

adjective

Kids Definition of aloof (Entry 2 of 2)

: not friendly or outgoing a shy aloof manner

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More from Merriam-Webster on aloof

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for aloof

Nglish: Translation of aloof for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of aloof for Arabic Speakers

Comments on aloof

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