allocution

noun

al·​lo·​cu·​tion ˌa-lə-ˈkyü-shən How to pronounce allocution (audio)
: a formal speech
especially : an authoritative or hortatory address

Examples of allocution in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The opinion by the three-judge panel, written by Judge Thomas Kirsch, also slammed the door on Arroyo’s argument that U.S. District Judge Steven Seeger erred at sentencing by deeming Arroyo’s allocution statements aggravating. Jason Meisner, Chicago Tribune, 28 July 2023 Before the judge announces the sentence, Crusius’ defense attorney is expected to deliver an allocution – a defendant’s formal address to the court – on behalf of the shooter to the El Paso courtroom. Rosa Flores, CNN, 7 July 2023 It is called the allocution. Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review, 18 Aug. 2020 From August 2013 to November 2014, LaFarge and LaFarge Cement Syria knowingly and willfully agreed to a conspiracy to make and authorize payments for the benefit of armed groups in Syria, Anderson said in a plea allocution. Aaron Katersky, ABC News, 18 Oct. 2022 During the first minute of his allocution statement, Gordon was stifled by tears. Johnny Magdaleno, The Indianapolis Star, 26 Sep. 2022 In his allocution on Thursday, Lewis implicated friend Rashaun Weaver, also now 16, as Majors' primary attacker nearly two years ago. NBC News, 15 Oct. 2021 Durst declined to give an allocution for the crime. Fox News, 14 Oct. 2021 And neither a judge nor a prosecutor is required to accept an allocution sliced so fine. Andrew C. McCarthy, National Review, 24 Aug. 2020 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'allocution.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

borrowed from Latin allocūtiōn-, allocūtiō "spoken or written address, manner of addressing, exhortation to an army," from allocū-, variant stem of alloquī "to speak to, address, make an appeal to" (from ad- ad- + loquī "to speak, talk") + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of verbal action — more at eloquent

First Known Use

1615, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of allocution was in 1615

Dictionary Entries Near allocution

Cite this Entry

“Allocution.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/allocution. Accessed 21 Feb. 2024.

Legal Definition

allocution

noun
al·​lo·​cu·​tion ˌa-lə-ˈkyü-shən How to pronounce allocution (audio)
: a formal speech
especially : one made by a defendant at the time of sentencing
Etymology

Latin allocutio, from alloqui to speak to, from ad to + loqui to speak

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!