abated; abating

intransitive verb

1
: to decrease in force or intensity
waiting for the storm to abate
2
a
: to become defeated or become null or void (as of a writ or appeal)
b
: to decrease in amount or value
The legacies abated proportionately.

transitive verb

1
a
: to put an end to
abate a nuisance
b
: nullify sense 1
abate a writ
2
a
: to reduce in degree or intensity : moderate
may abate their rancor to win peace
b
: to reduce in value or amount : to make less especially by way of relief
abate a tax
3
: deduct, omit
abate part of the price
4
a
: to beat down or cut away so as to leave a figure in relief
b
obsolete : blunt
5
abater noun

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Choose the Right Synonym for abate

abate, subside, wane, ebb mean to die down in force or intensity.

abate stresses the idea of progressive diminishing.

the storm abated

subside implies the ceasing of turbulence or agitation.

the protests subsided after a few days

wane suggests the fading or weakening of something good or impressive.

waning enthusiasm

ebb suggests the receding of something (such as the tide) that commonly comes and goes.

the ebbing of daylight

synonyms see in addition decrease

Example Sentences

For a while, in the Cold War's aftermath, the public fascination for espionage may abate, though somehow I doubt it. John le Carré, Boston Globe, 19 Nov. 1989 At about six, as the heat abated, people began to crowd the streets and marketplaces, and to fill the cafés. Milton Viorst, New Yorker, 12 Oct. 1987 But his attitude of sullen grievance and simmering fury never abated fully. Joseph Heller, God Knows, 1984 We waited for the wind to abate. interest in the author's home abated as her novels waned in popularity
Recent Examples on the Web While some managers predicted (or hoped) that a possible recession would scare employees away from demanding more from their company or quitting, the Great Resignation has yet to abate. Chloe Berger, Fortune, 25 Sep. 2022 Yet the war that has blocked those grain shipments for almost five months did not abate. Susie Blann, ajc, 22 July 2022 Disney’s proxy season is still months away, giving that controversy plenty of time to escalate—or abate. Dan Gallagher, WSJ, 16 Aug. 2022 The $600,000 project provides enough power to meet the energy needs of the facility and will abate more than 200 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year, Matt Prine, president of Indiana American Water, said. Carrie Napoleon, Chicago Tribune, 5 Aug. 2022 The good news, experts say, is that the chip shortage should abate sometime in the next six to 18 months. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, 17 July 2022 Investors are searching for answers to when inflation will abate amid fears of an impending recession. Jason Bisnoff, Forbes, 28 June 2022 The rain will likely abate while cooler temperatures lessen snowmelt in coming days, Mottice said. CBS News, 13 June 2022 The rain will likely abate while cooler temperatures lessen snowmelt in coming days, Mottice said. The Salt Lake Tribune, 13 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'abate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English abaten, borrowed from Anglo-French abatre "to strike down, fell, reduce, put an end to," from a-, prefix in transitive verbs (going back to Latin ad- ad-) + batre "to beat," going back to Latin battuere, of uncertain origin

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of abate was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near abate

Cite this Entry

“Abate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/abate. Accessed 3 Oct. 2022.

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Kids Definition

abated; abating
: to make or become less
The flood abated slowly.
abatement
-mənt
noun The noise continued without abatement.

Legal Definition

abated; abating

transitive verb

1
a
: to put an end to or do away with
abate a nuisance
b
: to make void : nullify
abate an action
2
: to reduce in amount especially proportionately
abate a tax

intransitive verb

1
: to become defeated or become null or void
when a public officer who is a party to an appeal…in an official capacity dies…the action does not abate Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure Rule 43
2
: to decrease in amount or value
the legacies abated proportionately

Note: A problem arises in estate law when the amount of the bequests and devises made in a will exceeds the assets available in the estate. In such a case, some or all of the bequests and devises may have to be abated to make up the deficit. Under the Uniform Probate Code, property in the estate that is not given under the will abates first, residuary devises abate second, general devises abate third, and specific devises abate last.

History and Etymology for abate

Old French abattre, literally, to knock down, from a-, prefix stressing result + battre to beat

More from Merriam-Webster on abate

Last Updated: 29 Sep 2022

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