moor

noun (1)
\ˈmu̇r \

Definition of moor 

(Entry 1 of 3)

1 chiefly British : an expanse of open rolling infertile land

2 : a boggy area especially : one that is peaty and dominated by grasses and sedges

moor

verb
moored; mooring; moors

Definition of moor (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

: to make fast with or as if with cables, lines, or anchors : anchor

intransitive verb

1 : to secure a boat by mooring : anchor

2 : to be made fast

Moor

noun (2)
\ˈmu̇r \

Definition of Moor (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : one of the Arab and Berber conquerors of Spain

2 : berber

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Other Words from moor

Noun (2)

Moorish \ -​ish \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for moor

Synonyms: Noun (1)

champaign, down(s), grassland, heath, lea (or ley), llano, pampa, plain, prairie, savanna (also savannah), steppe, tundra, veld (or veldt)

Synonyms: Verb

anchor, catch, clamp, fasten, fix, hitch, secure, set

Antonyms: Verb

loose, loosen, unfasten, unfix, unloose, unloosen

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Examples of moor in a Sentence

Noun (1)

as she wanders the windswept moor, the novel's heroine vows that she will never marry the vicar a mysterious figure who was said to have haunted the moors of southwest England

Verb

We found a harbor and moored the boat there for the night. The boat was moored alongside the dock. We need to find a place to moor for the night.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Ideal trip: Long drives in the countryside, preferably across moors. John Schwartz, New York Times, "Audiobooks for Those Long Summer Drives, Without the Kids," 28 May 2018 Set in 1972, in an English village on the edge of a moor, the movie follows Julie and Andrew (Mickey Sumner and Ruben Crow), married small-time journalists who notice suspicious military activity in the area and take photographs. Jeannette Catsoulis, New York Times, "Review: In ‘Caught,’ a Couple Lets the Wrong Ones In," 29 Mar. 2018 Off-roading on the moors is on the weekend agenda. 13. Sarah Solomon, Town & Country, "25 Signs You Summer in Nantucket," 20 July 2017 From old-fashioned Lake District comfort and the Yorkshire moors, to Cornwall’s Atlantic coast, via luminous, marshy North Norfolk and the valleys of Wales, there’s a world at your feet. USA TODAY, "20 of Britain’s best hotels for walking," 6 Mar. 2018 In what is usually the balmiest part of the British Isles, the hills and moors of southwestern England could get close to two feet of snow by Friday morning, with an additional half foot on top of that by Saturday. John Hopewell, Washington Post, "Brutal storm is pummeling Britain with heavy snow and wicked wind chill," 28 Feb. 2018 An insular animal lover, Bronte shocked Victorian audiences with her dark, gritty novel, a tale of base lust and impassioned violence set against the stark backdrop of English moor country. Ryan P. Smith, Smithsonian, "Ten Major Anniversaries Worth Traveling For This Year," 30 Jan. 2018 Celebrate the birth of a Brit Lit great with a brooding stroll across England’s moor country, or carol your way through a not-so-silent night in Austria’s Salzburg region this Christmas to celebrate 200 years of a world-famous hymn. Ryan P. Smith, Smithsonian, "Ten Major Anniversaries Worth Traveling For This Year," 30 Jan. 2018 She was dressed as the Grimpen Mire, not a Scottish moor. New York Times, "Corrections: January 26, 2018," 25 Jan. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Parties are built on the backbones of people who have worked and labored in the vineyard for years, sticking envelopes and putting up yard signs, and it's moored most of all in a shared philosophy. Amber Phillips, Washington Post, "‘We have a profound problem’: Mark Sanford has some thoughts about Trump and the truth," 22 June 2018 Sixteen sections of underwater oil and gas pipelines in the Straits of Mackinac were found unsupported on the Great Lakes bottom during 2003 inspections — spans of 140 feet or longer, well beyond state requirements for mooring the pipe. Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press, "Why Line 5 oil pipeline isn't on Mackinac Policy Conference agenda," 29 May 2018 The worst conditions, where disease and malnutrition were most rampant, were on the handful of prison ships moored in Wallabout Bay, near what is now the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Harrison Smith, Washington Post, "‘Turn out your dead!’ In America’s War for Independence, POWs paid a terrible price.," 4 July 2018 The harbor operations division, which previously was under the assistant city manager, covers day-to-day, on-the-water needs, including code enforcement, mooring management and general customer service. Hillary Davis, latimes.com, "Newport OKs standalone Harbor Department," 15 June 2018 About 100 boats moored on the east side of the yacht club were moved to other moorings farther north in the small boat basin. sandiegouniontribune.com, "May 24, 1960: Tsunami reaches San Diego," 24 May 2018 The Coast Guard reported that the leak had been plugged and the vessel was moored at Nashville Wharf by 1:21 p.m. Carlie Kollath Wells, NOLA.com, "Algiers ferry resumes service after fuel spill in Mississippi River," 13 Apr. 2018 The boat heads to the scrapyard in 2015after being moored in Tacoma for 11 years. Morning Brief, The Seattle Times, "We go inside Amazon’s warehouse world, plus Kam Chancellor retires from the NFL | Monday Morning Brief, July 2," 2 July 2018 Boats moored outside the riverfront townhouse that’s on the market. Ruth Bloomfield, WSJ, "A Fashionable Escape From London Loses Its Buoyancy," 27 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'moor.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of moor

Noun (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Noun (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for moor

Noun (1)

Middle English mor, from Old English mōr; akin to Old High German muor moor

Verb

Middle English moren; akin to Middle Dutch meren, maren to tie, moor

Noun (2)

Middle English More, from Anglo-French, from Latin Maurus inhabitant of Mauretania

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Dictionary Entries near moor

moonwort

moony

moop

moor

Moor

Moor's head

moorage

Statistics for moor

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Time Traveler for moor

The first known use of moor was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for moor

moor

noun

English Language Learners Definition of moor

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a broad area of open land that is not good for farming

moor

verb

English Language Learners Definition of moor (Entry 2 of 3)

: to hold (a boat or ship) in place with ropes or cables or with an anchor

Moor

noun

English Language Learners Definition of Moor (Entry 3 of 3)

: a member of a group of North African Arab people who ruled parts of Spain from the eighth century until 1492

moor

noun
\ˈmu̇r \

Kids Definition of moor

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an area of open land that is too wet or too poor for farming

moor

verb
moored; mooring

Kids Definition of moor (Entry 2 of 2)

: to fasten in place with cables, lines, or anchors moor a boat

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