introduce


in·tro·duce

verb \ˌin-trə-ˈdüs, -ˈdyüs\

: to make (someone) known to someone else by name

: to cause (something) to begin to be used for the first time

: to make (something) available for sale for the first time

in·tro·ducedin·tro·duc·ing

Full Definition of INTRODUCE

transitive verb
1
:  to lead or bring in especially for the first time <introduce a nonnative species>
2
a :  to bring into play
b :  to bring into practice or use :  institute
3
:  to lead to or make known by a formal act, announcement, or recommendation: as
a :  to cause to be acquainted
b :  to present formally at court or into society
c :  to present or announce formally or officially or by an official reading <introduce legislation>
d :  to make preliminary explanatory or laudatory remarks about
e :  to bring (as an actor or singer) before the public for the first time
4
:  place, insert <introduce foreign genes into crops>
5
:  to bring to a knowledge of something <introduced them to new ideas>
in·tro·duc·er noun

Examples of INTRODUCE

  1. Let me introduce myself: my name is John Smith.
  2. They have been slow to introduce changes in procedure.
  3. The designer is introducing a new line of clothes.
  4. He introduced several issues during the meeting.
  5. New evidence was introduced at the trial.
  6. introduce a bill to Congress

Origin of INTRODUCE

Middle English, from Latin introducere, from intro- + ducere to lead — more at tow
First Known Use: 15th century

Synonym Discussion of INTRODUCE

introduce, insert, insinuate, interpolate, intercalate, interpose, interject mean to put between or among others. introduce is a general term for bringing or placing a thing or person into a group or body already in existence <introduced a new topic into the conversation>. insert implies putting into a fixed or open space between or among <inserted a clause in the contract>. insinuate implies introducing gradually or by gentle pressure <insinuated himself into the group>. interpolate applies to the inserting of something extraneous or spurious <interpolated her own comments into the report>. intercalate suggests an intrusive inserting of something in an existing series or sequence <new chapters intercalated with the old>. interpose suggests inserting an obstruction or cause of delay <interpose barriers to communication>. interject implies an abrupt or forced introduction <interjected a question>.

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