interpose


in·ter·pose

verb \ˌin-tər-ˈpōz\

: to place (someone or something) between two or more things or people

: to interrupt a conversation with (a comment)

in·ter·posedin·ter·pos·ing

Full Definition of INTERPOSE

transitive verb
1
a :  to place in an intervening position
b :  to put (oneself) between :  intrude
2
:  to put forth by way of interference or intervention
3
:  to introduce or throw in between the parts of a conversation or argument
intransitive verb
1
:  to be or come between
2
:  to step in between parties at variance :  intervene
3
:  interrupt
in·ter·pos·er noun

Examples of INTERPOSE

  1. The new system has interposed a bureaucratic barrier between doctors and patients.
  2. He tried to interpose himself between the people who were fighting.
  3. Please allow me to interpose a brief observation.

Origin of INTERPOSE

Middle French interposer, from Latin interponere (perfect indicative interposui), from inter- + ponere to put — more at position
First Known Use: 1582

Synonym Discussion of INTERPOSE

interpose, interfere, intervene, mediate, intercede mean to come or go between. interpose often implies no more than this <interposed herself between him and the door>. interfere implies hindering <noise interfered with my concentration>. intervene may imply an occurring in space or time between two things or a stepping in to stop a conflict <quarreled until the manager intervened>. mediate implies intervening between hostile factions <mediated between the parties>. intercede implies acting for an offender in begging mercy or forgiveness <interceded on our behalf>.

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