dispatch

9 ENTRIES FOUND:

1dis·patch

verb \di-ˈspach\

: to send (someone or something) quickly to a particular place for a particular purpose

: to defeat (a person or team) in a game, contest, etc.

: to kill (a person or animal) quickly

Full Definition of DISPATCH

transitive verb
1
:  to send off or away with promptness or speed; especially :  to send off on official business
2
a :  to kill with quick efficiency
b obsolete :  deprive
3
:  to dispose of (as a task) rapidly or efficiently
4
:  defeat 3
intransitive verb
archaic :  to make haste :  hurry
dis·patch·er noun

Examples of DISPATCH

  1. Rescue workers were immediately dispatched to the area.
  2. The hotel dispatched a limo to pick us up from the airport.
  3. He dispatched the guard with one bullet.

Origin of DISPATCH

Spanish despachar or Italian dispacciare, from Occitan despachar to get rid of, from Middle French despechier to set free, from Old French, from des- dis- + -pechier (as in enpechier to ensnare) — more at impeach
First Known Use: 1517

2dis·patch

noun \di-ˈspach, ˈdis-ˌpach\

: an important official message

: the act of sending someone or something to a particular place for a particular purpose

: a news story that a reporter sends to a newspaper usually from a foreign country

Full Definition of DISPATCH

1
a :  a message sent with speed; especially :  an important official message sent by a diplomatic, military, or naval officer
b :  a news item filed by a correspondent
2
:  the act of dispatching: as
a obsolete :  dismissal
b :  the act of killing
c (1) :  prompt settlement (as of an item of business)
(2) :  quick riddance
d :  a sending off :  shipment
3
:  promptness and efficiency in performance or transmission <done with dispatch>

Examples of DISPATCH

  1. The general sent a dispatch to headquarters.
  2. He requested the immediate dispatch of supplies.
  3. The reporter sent many dispatches from the war zone.

First Known Use of DISPATCH

1537

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