Law Dictionary

Social Security Act

Law 42 U.S.C. § 401 et seq. (1935)
  1. established a permanent national old-age pension system through employer and employee contributions; later it was extended to include dependents, the disabled, and other groups. Responding to the economic impact of the Great Depression, 5,000,000 elderly people in the early 1930s joined nationwide Townsend clubs, promoted by Francis E. Townsend to support his program demanding a $200 monthly pension for everyone over the age of 60. In 1934 President Franklin D. Roosevelt set up a committee on economic security to consider the matter; after studying its recommendations, Congress in 1935 enacted the Social Security Act, providing old-age benefits to be financed by a payroll tax on employers and employees. Railroad employees were covered separately under the Railroad Retirement Act of 1934. The Social Security Act has been periodically amended, expanding the types of coverage, bringing progressively more workers into the system, and adjusting both taxes and benefits in an attempt to keep pace with inflation.


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