young

1 of 2

adjective

younger ˈyəŋ-gər How to pronounce young (audio) ; youngest ˈyəŋ-gəst How to pronounce young (audio)
1
a
: being in the first or an early stage of life, growth, or development
c
: of an early, tender, or desirable age for use as food or drink
fresh young lamb
a young wine
2
: having little experience
3
a
: recently come into being : new
a young publishing company
4
: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of youth or a young person
young at heart
5
capitalized : representing a new or rejuvenated especially political group or movement
youngish adjective
youngness noun

young

2 of 2

noun

plural young
1
plural
a
: young persons : youth
b
: immature offspring
used especially of animals
2
: a single recently born or hatched animal
Phrases
with young
of a female animal

Examples of young in a Sentence

Adjective He looks young for his age. A very nice young man greeted us at the door. Young people today have a lot of opportunities. He dreamed of being an artist when he was young. The movie isn't suitable for young viewers. He's still too young to buy alcohol legally. Our youngest daughter just started school. When I was young,” the man said, “the world was a different place.” The season is still young. Noun music that appeals to the young The very young and the elderly are particularly sensitive to the disease. a robin feeding her young The young of a wolf are called pups. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Adjective
What’s more is that the poll finds Biden’s support has eroded among young people, with Trump leading Biden by four percentage points among voters ages 18 to 24. Mark Murray, NBC News, 20 Nov. 2023 Co-host Sara Haines agreed, saying she was shocked by younger voters' reaction to Biden's support of Israel. Asher Notheis, Washington Examiner, 20 Nov. 2023 Listeria infections can cause serious, and sometimes fatal, illness in young children, frail or elderly people, as well as others with weakened immune systems, according to the CDC. Kate Gibson, CBS News, 20 Nov. 2023 Students and young people protested at universities and concerts, and the military responded with extreme violence. Matthew Dursum, SPIN, 20 Nov. 2023 Both parents had great respect for education, and pushed Saar and her two younger siblings to embrace its possibilities. Hilton Als, The New Yorker, 20 Nov. 2023 After inking a record contract at age 14, Usher hit puberty and lost control of his voice (definitely formative), then ventured north to New York to enlist in a pop star boot camp overseen by a young Sean Combs. Chris Richards, Washington Post, 20 Nov. 2023 My second piece for young entrepreneurs is to start early. Jane Thier, Fortune, 19 Nov. 2023 President Biden is struggling to connect with younger voters. Catherine Lucey, WSJ, 19 Nov. 2023
Noun
By 1986, Lampley was ringside in upstate New York broadcasting young Mike Tyson’s destruction of veteran Jesse Ferguson. Ivan Carter, San Diego Union-Tribune, 28 Sep. 2023 Researchers warn the shift can have dire consequences for animals like penguins who breed and rear their young on the sea ice, while also hastening global warming by reducing how much sunlight is reflected by white ice back into space. Reuters, NBC News, 26 Sep. 2023 However, this is the SEC and starting that young is difficult. Matt Stahl | Mstahl@al.com, al, 2 Sep. 2023 Simmons: There’s an effort to anger and divide our nation, and the indoctrination of our young to support that effort must stop. Beth Mlady, cleveland, 8 Sep. 2023 This is Idzik’s first season as the Bucs receivers coach, but older players are blown away by the collection young of talent at their position. Rick Stroud, Orlando Sentinel, 17 Aug. 2023 During the annual pupping season, the area is swarmed with mothers who raise their young on the coastline. Emily Alvarenga, San Diego Union-Tribune, 12 Aug. 2023 Those toxins accumulate in the whales’ blubber, and are also concentrated in mothers’ milk and passed down to their nursing young. Julia O’Malley, New York Times, 19 July 2023 In a New York Times column last month, economist Paul Krugman argued that the country had actually handled its key economic problem — a demographic shift from a young to an elderly society — relatively well. Adam Taylor, Washington Post, 10 Aug. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'young.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Adjective

Middle English yong, from Old English geong; akin to Old High German jung young, Latin juvenis

First Known Use

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of young was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near young

Cite this Entry

“Young.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/young. Accessed 2 Dec. 2023.

Kids Definition

young

1 of 2 adjective
younger ˈyəŋ-gər How to pronounce young (audio) ; youngest ˈyəŋ-gəst How to pronounce young (audio)
1
a
: being in the early stage of life, growth, or development
2
: lacking in experience
3
: recently come into being : new
young rock strata
4
: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of youth or a young person
young at heart
youngness noun

young

2 of 2 noun plural
1
: young persons : youth
music that appeals to the young
2
: immature or recently born offspring
a bear and her young

Medical Definition

young

noun
plural young
1
: immature offspring
used especially of animals
2
: a single recently born or hatched animal

Biographical Definition

Young 1 of 6

biographical name (1)

Andrew Jackson, Jr. 1932–     U.S. ambassador to U.N. (1977–79)

Young

2 of 6

biographical name (2)

Brig*ham ˈbri-gəm How to pronounce Young (audio) 1801–1877 American Mormon leader

Young

3 of 6

biographical name (3)

Cy originally Denton True Young 1867–1955 American baseball player

Young

4 of 6

biographical name (4)

Michael W(arren) 1949–     American geneticist

Young

5 of 6

biographical name (5)

Owen D. 1874–1962 American lawyer

Young

6 of 6

biographical name (6)

Whitney Moore 1921–1971 American civil rights leader

More from Merriam-Webster on young

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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