witch

noun
\ ˈwich How to pronounce witch (audio) \

Definition of witch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : one that is credited with usually malignant supernatural powers especially : a woman practicing usually black witchcraft often with the aid of a devil or familiar : sorceress — compare warlock
2 : an ugly old woman : hag
3 : a charming or alluring girl or woman
4 : an adherent of Wicca

witch

verb
witched; witching; witches

Definition of witch (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to affect injuriously with witchcraft
2 archaic : to influence or beguile with allure or charm

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from witch

Noun

witchlike \ ˈwich-​ˌlīk How to pronounce witchlike (audio) \ adjective
witchy \ ˈwi-​chē How to pronounce witchy (audio) \ adjective

Examples of witch in a Sentence

Noun an herbalist and self-proclaimed witch Her mother-in-law is a bitter old witch. Verb the woman did witch me with her gentle smile
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Skylight Opera Theatre and Milwaukee Opera Theatre team up on Gilbert and Sullivan's satirical comic opera, featuring ghosts and a witch's curse. Jim Higgins, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "20 enticing Milwaukee concerts and shows in early 2020," 2 Jan. 2020 Toss in her witch's cloak, hat, and mini broomstick from the second film, and Marnie is still living her best life in 2019. Stacey Grant, Seventeen, "Kimberly J. Brown Reflects on the Magic of Halloweentown High, 15 Years Later," 8 Oct. 2019 That’s one of the only things that apparently keeps witches at bay. Mark Kennedy, Detroit Free Press, "‘The Wretched’ wastes some good ideas," 1 May 2020 The series brought new narrative complexity and psychological — and especially psychosexual — richness to a pastiche of familiar characters, from Frankenstein's monster to Dr. Jekyll to myriad interconnected vampires, werewolves and witches. Daniel Fienberg, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Penny Dreadful: City of Angels': TV Review," 24 Apr. 2020 The show centers on three witches who have just turned 18. Jill Gutowitz, Teen Vogue, "In "Motherland: Fort Salem," Men Are Irrelevant," 25 Mar. 2020 Dress code: The first day of carnival kicks off with women dressed up in witch costumes pretending to kidnap the mayor and take control over the city. Shauna Beni, Condé Nast Traveler, "A Guide to the Wildest Carnival Celebrations Around the World," 31 Jan. 2020 Maybe Lear’s eldest daughter turns out to be a witch? Daniel Pollack-pelzner, The New Yorker, "What Shakespeare Actually Did During the Plague," 1 Apr. 2020 Opera Santa Barbara shares its 2019 production of Robert Ward’s musical adaptation of playwright Arthur Miller’s allegorical drama set during the Salem witch trials in 17th century Massachusetts. Matt Cooper, Los Angeles Times, "Kevin Kline in ‘Present Laughter’: Your free quarantine must-watch of the day," 14 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The favorite, at 4-5, hasn’t had a misstep for trainer Peter Miller, who is witching to jockey Flavien Prat. Los Angeles Times, "Racing! Del Mar in the homestretch," 28 Aug. 2019 Investors are warned that volatility can increase during a quadruple witching as traders adjust their positions. The New York Times, New York Times, "Expect Fed to Raise Interest Rate and F.C.C. to Repeal Net Neutrality," 10 Dec. 2017 Those include Agni's Philosophy and Witch Chapter 0 [cry], the latter of which used bleeding-edge software and hardware in the form of DirectX 12, an eight-core Intel processor, and four Nvidia Titan X graphics cards. Mark Walton, Ars Technica, "Final Fantasy 15 on PC: Has Square Enix lost its way, or do graphics really matter?," 25 Aug. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'witch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of witch

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for witch

Noun

Middle English wicche, from Old English wicca, masculine, wizard & wicce, feminine, witch; akin to Middle High German wicken to bewitch, Old English wigle divination, and perhaps to Old High German wīh holy — more at victim

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about witch

Time Traveler for witch

Time Traveler

The first known use of witch was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for witch

Last Updated

2 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Witch.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/witch. Accessed 6 Jun. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for witch

witch

noun
How to pronounce witch (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of witch

: a woman who is thought to have magic powers
: a person who practices magic as part of a religion (such as Wicca)
informal : a very unpleasant woman

witch

noun
\ ˈwich How to pronounce witch (audio) \

Kids Definition of witch

1 : a person and especially a woman believed to have magic powers
2 : an ugly or mean old woman

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on witch

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for witch

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with witch

Spanish Central: Translation of witch

Nglish: Translation of witch for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of witch for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about witch

Comments on witch

What made you want to look up witch? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

See Definitions and Examples »

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

May 2020 Words of the Day Quiz

  • a blooming wisteria tree
  • Which is a synonym of exiguous?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Add Diction

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!