water table

noun

Definition of water table

1 : a stringcourse or similar member when projecting so as to throw off water
2 : the upper limit of the portion of the ground wholly saturated with water

Examples of water table in a Sentence

Heavy rainfall has caused the water table to rise.
Recent Examples on the Web If the soil organic matter is much higher than ideal (5 to 8%), the soil can have too much available phosphorus, which can stunt plant growth and potentially leach into the water table. oregonlive, "Lime won’t fix your moss problem and other garden myths debunked," 14 Nov. 2020 The diminishing water table in California's central and Salinas valleys, where most of America's salads originate in industrial-scale farms. Jeff Rowe, Star Tribune, "Review: Why small farms need a reordering of our society," 27 Oct. 2020 This has lowered the water table and could imperil some of the newfound obscure species that live there. Ralf Britz, National Geographic, "Dragon snakeheads—strange new underground fish—discovered in India," 19 Oct. 2020 The path wanders among junipers, mesquite and crucifixion thorn trees, occasionally ducking into drainages and washes where spots of cottonwoods and Arizona walnut trees sink roots deep into the water table. Mare Czinar, The Arizona Republic, "New hiking trails near Sedona hint at bigger things to come. Here's how to explore them," 16 Oct. 2020 Workers in church yards dug pits down to the water table, layering bodies and dirt, more bodies and dirt. Washington Post, "Medieval Europeans didn’t understand how the Plague spread. Their response wasn’t so different from ours now.," 14 Oct. 2020 The leaves tremble, shedding the drops, which fall and join their countless comrades already percolating through the soil, toward the water table and thence to the mighty ocean. John Kelly, Washington Post, "Do you hear that? These are just a few of my favorite sounds.," 20 Sep. 2020 This intricate underground network lowers the water table, which is near the soil surface in most of Indiana, and creates more room for crops to develop deeper and stronger root systems. Sarah Bowman, The Indianapolis Star, "Scrub Hub: What are drainage tiles and why are they an environmental issue?," 9 Sep. 2020 According to Encyclopedia Britannica, the water table is the upper level of underground surfaces that are permanently saturated with groundwater. Nora Mcgreevy, Smithsonian Magazine, "NASA Photos Reveal a Lake of Water—Not Lava—on Kīlauea Volcano," 20 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'water table.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of water table

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for water table

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The first known use of water table was in the 15th century

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Statistics for water table

Last Updated

28 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Water table.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/water%20table. Accessed 30 Nov. 2020.

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More Definitions for water table

water table

noun

English Language Learners Definition of water table

technical : the highest underground level at which the rocks and soil in a particular area are completely wet with water

More from Merriam-Webster on water table

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about water table

Comments on water table

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