vitamin D

noun

Definition of vitamin D

: any or all of several fat-soluble vitamins chemically related to steroids, essential for normal bone and tooth structure, and found especially in fish-liver oils, egg yolk, and milk or produced by activation (as by ultraviolet irradiation) of sterols: such as
a or vitamin D2 \ -​ˈdē-​ˈtü How to pronounce vitamin D (audio) \ : calciferol
b or vitamin D3 \ -​ˈdē-​ˈthrē How to pronounce vitamin D (audio) \ : cholecalciferol

Examples of vitamin D in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Has vitamin D deficiency been linked to higher risk for infection and more virulent illness if infected? Annie Berman, Anchorage Daily News, "Alaska coronavirus Q&A: How do current hospitalization rates compare to an average flu season?," 20 Jan. 2021 And vitamin D supplements can also provide some relief. Washington Post, "Why it’s so hard to identify seasonal depression in kids, and how to help," 28 Dec. 2020 Unsupervised and/or excessive vitamin D intake can lead to toxicity. Miriam Fauzia, USA TODAY, "Fact check: More study needed on link between vitamin D deficiency, COVID-19 mortality," 17 Dec. 2020 In some medications, vitamin D is combined with a steroid. Lisa Bain, Good Housekeeping, "The Best Lotions and Creams to Help Ease Psoriasis," 17 Dec. 2020 As to other remedies, Anshu recommends upping your vitamin D intake as winter sunlight from October to early March may not contain enough UVB radiation for our skin to produce its own. Sadhbh O'sullivan, refinery29.com, "SAD Is Going To Hit Different This Year. Here’s How To Cope," 17 Nov. 2020 The first study, the longest and largest randomized trial of its kind, looked at whether an omega-3 fatty acid supplement and/or a vitamin D supplement provided any benefit in preventing atrial fibrillation. Jen Christensen, CNN, "Fish oil doesn't seem to prevent heart problems, studies find," 15 Nov. 2020 He was treated at Walter Reed Military Medical Center with remdesivir, an experimental polyclonal antibody cocktail, and was taking zinc, vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin, and a daily aspirin. Zachary Halaschak, Washington Examiner, "Reporter in Biden press pool tests positive for coronavirus," 16 Dec. 2020 The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends a total daily intake of 1,200 milligrams calcium and between 800 to 1,000 international units (IUs) of vitamin D for good bone health. Lindsay Warner, Outside Online, "The Athlete's Guide to Menopause," 8 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'vitamin D.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of vitamin D

circa 1921, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for vitamin D

Time Traveler

The first known use of vitamin D was circa 1921

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Statistics for vitamin D

Last Updated

24 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Vitamin D.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vitamin%20D. Accessed 28 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for vitamin D

vitamin D

noun

Medical Definition of vitamin D

: any or all of several fat-soluble vitamins chemically related to steroids, essential for normal bone and tooth structure, and found especially in fish-liver oils, egg yolk, and milk or produced by activation (as by ultraviolet irradiation) of sterols: as
b : cholecalciferol

called also sunshine vitamin

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