vindicate

verb
vin·​di·​cate | \ ˈvin-də-ˌkāt How to pronounce vindicate (audio) \
vindicated; vindicating

Definition of vindicate

transitive verb

1a : to free from allegation or blame
(2) : to provide justification or defense for : justify
c : to protect from attack or encroachment : defend
2 : avenge
3 : to maintain a right to
4 obsolete : to set free : deliver

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Synonyms & Antonyms for vindicate

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Choose the Right Synonym for vindicate

exculpate, absolve, exonerate, acquit, vindicate mean to free from a charge. exculpate implies a clearing from blame or fault often in a matter of small importance. exculpating himself from the charge of overenthusiasm absolve implies a release either from an obligation that binds the conscience or from the consequences of disobeying the law or committing a sin. cannot be absolved of blame exonerate implies a complete clearance from an accusation or charge and from any attendant suspicion of blame or guilt. exonerated by the investigation acquit implies a formal decision in one's favor with respect to a definite charge. voted to acquit the defendant vindicate may refer to things as well as persons that have been subjected to critical attack or imputation of guilt, weakness, or folly, and implies a clearing effected by proving the unfairness of such criticism or blame. her judgment was vindicated

maintain, assert, defend, vindicate, justify mean to uphold as true, right, just, or reasonable. maintain stresses firmness of conviction. steadfastly maintained his innocence assert suggests determination to make others accept one's claim. asserted her rights defend implies maintaining in the face of attack or criticism. defended his voting record vindicate implies successfully defending. his success vindicated our faith in him justify implies showing to be true, just, or valid by appeal to a standard or to precedent. the action was used to justify military intervention

Did You Know?

It's not surprising that the two earliest senses of "vindicate," which has been used in English since at least the mid-16th century, are "to set free" (a sense that is now obsolete) and "to avenge." Vindicate derives from Latin vindicatus, the past participle of the verb vindicare, meaning "to set free, avenge, or lay claim to." "Vindicare," in turn, derives from "vindex," a noun meaning "claimant" or "avenger." Other descendants of "vindicare" in English include such vengeful words as "avenge" itself, "revenge," "vengeance," "vendetta," and "vindictive." Closer cousins of "vindicate" are "vindicable" ("capable of being vindicated") and the archaic word vindicative ("punitive").

Examples of vindicate in a Sentence

She will be completely vindicated by the evidence. These discoveries vindicate their theory. Their approach to the problem has been vindicated by the positive results. He felt vindicated when the truth became known.
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Recent Examples on the Web Tsai was swift to rebuff that suggestion—a decision vindicated by the tear gas and rubber bullets that have since engulfed the banking and trading entrepôt, boosting her popularity especially amongst younger Taiwanese. Time, "Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen Wins Reelection With Record Support," 11 Jan. 2020 This decision has been totally vindicated by history. Jay Cost, National Review, "In Praise of Gerald Ford," 9 Sep. 2019 Robert McGinley, a member of the family that sold the property and provided a loan for the Cannons to buy it, said he felt vindicated by the ruling. Robert Mccoppin, chicagotribune.com, "Cook County forest district poised to regain 400-acre Barrington Hills farm, but foreclosed owners hope hemp crop can bail them out," 24 June 2019 In the first College Football Playoff, Meyer got his revenge on Saban, and college football felt vindicated for changing its postseason forever. Joseph Goodman | Jgoodman@al.com, al, "What a ride: Unprecedented decade in Alabama shaped college football," 31 Dec. 2019 Here the House is vindicating the principle of separation of powers. Noah Feldman, Twin Cities, "Noah Feldman: Trump impeachment is a shot in the arm for the Constitution," 20 Dec. 2019 In the advocacy culture of our new media, ex-government officials such as Brennan, Clapper, and McCabe can be paid to appear on news programs to analyze (or vindicate) their own unethical behavior. Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "Former Intelligence Chiefs Fit Perfectly into Media Advocacy Culture," 19 Dec. 2019 When The Dallas Morning News in July 2014 reported that nearly all push buttons in the city didn't speed up the walk signal, McDonald felt vindicated. Hayat Norimine, Dallas News, "What's the status of Dallas' pedestrian push buttons? Curious Texas investigates," 23 Aug. 2019 The angry tone of the comments reflected what people close to the president have said is a keen desire by Trump to be publicly vindicated in a Senate trial, a prospect that Pelosi appears to be placing in jeopardy. BostonGlobe.com, "Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi insisted Thursday that Senate Republicans must provide details on witnesses and testimony before she would send over the charges for Trump’s trial. No deal, replied Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell after meeting with his Senate Democratic counterpart.," 20 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'vindicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of vindicate

circa 1571, in the meaning defined at sense 4

History and Etymology for vindicate

Latin vindicatus, past participle of vindicare to lay claim to, avenge, from vindic-, vindex claimant, avenger

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Time Traveler for vindicate

Time Traveler

The first known use of vindicate was circa 1571

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Statistics for vindicate

Last Updated

20 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Vindicate.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vindicating. Accessed 22 January 2020.

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More Definitions for vindicate

vindicate

verb
How to pronounce vindicate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of vindicate

: to show that (someone) should not be blamed for a crime, mistake, etc. : to show that (someone) is not guilty
: to show that (someone or something that has been criticized or doubted) is correct, true, or reasonable

vindicate

verb
vin·​di·​cate | \ ˈvin-də-ˌkāt How to pronounce vindicate (audio) \
vindicated; vindicating

Kids Definition of vindicate

1 : to free from blame or guilt The evidence will vindicate her.
2 : to show to be true or correct Later discoveries vindicated their claim.

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