twinge

noun
\ ˈtwinj How to pronounce twinge (audio) \

Definition of twinge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a sudden sharp stab of pain
2 : a moral or emotional pang a twinge of conscience a twinge of sympathy

twinge

verb
twinged; twinging\ ˈtwin-​jiŋ How to pronounce twinge (audio) \ or twingeing

Definition of twinge (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 dialect : pluck, tweak
2 : to affect with a sharp pain or pang

intransitive verb

: to feel a sudden sharp local pain

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Synonyms for twinge

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of twinge in a Sentence

Noun He felt a twinge of arthritis when he stood up. I still feel an occasional twinge in my leg from the accident. I felt a twinge of guilt. I must admit to a twinge of envy.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Gordon-Reed’s twinge of possessiveness sprung from a childhood steeped in seeing Texas as special. Joy Wallace Dickinson, orlandosentinel.com, 13 June 2021 But even the most ardent Beavers fans have to feel at least a twinge of concern following Friday’s opener. Joe Freeman, oregonlive, 4 June 2021 The Oregon State Beavers’ fading prospects of winning a Pac-12 Conference baseball championship were infused with a twinge of hope Sunday afternoon in Phoenix. Joe Freeman, oregonlive, 16 May 2021 One suspects a man like Poirot, who does not take affronts lightly, might feel a twinge of satisfaction upon learning, later that day, that Mr. Morley has been murdered. Christoph Irmscher, WSJ, 16 Apr. 2021 There was a twinge of hope during Saturday’s 3-1 loss to the Blue Jays. Anthony Stitt, Forbes, 21 Mar. 2021 Abbott — a strong, sensitive actor, great on Girls, and even better in Jerrod Carmichael’s upcoming On the Count of Three — lacks the banal, domesticated twinge of evil, the unaffected prowl of a natural bully that the role seems to call for. K. Austin Collins, Rolling Stone, 7 Mar. 2021 Who doesn’t feel a twinge of misgiving on noticing that Minor Reality Star X is having a sale? Laurence Scott, Wired, 4 Feb. 2021 Another twinge of self-consciousness came during a phone conversation with a childhood friend. New York Times, 29 Jan. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The twist, however, is the sauce — a rich, steaming hot broth twinged with tomato and a gentle chile buzz that more closely resembles a soup. Dominic Armato, azcentral, 6 Dec. 2019 The twist, however, is the sauce — a rich, steaming hot broth twinged with tomato and a gentle chile buzz that more closely resembles a soup. Dominic Armato, azcentral, 6 Dec. 2019 The twist, however, is the sauce — a rich, steaming hot broth twinged with tomato and a gentle chile buzz that more closely resembles a soup. Dominic Armato, azcentral, 6 Dec. 2019 The twist, however, is the sauce — a rich, steaming hot broth twinged with tomato and a gentle chile buzz that more closely resembles a soup. Dominic Armato, azcentral, 6 Dec. 2019 The twist, however, is the sauce — a rich, steaming hot broth twinged with tomato and a gentle chile buzz that more closely resembles a soup. Dominic Armato, azcentral, 6 Dec. 2019 The twist, however, is the sauce — a rich, steaming hot broth twinged with tomato and a gentle chile buzz that more closely resembles a soup. Dominic Armato, azcentral, 6 Dec. 2019 The twist, however, is the sauce — a rich, steaming hot broth twinged with tomato and a gentle chile buzz that more closely resembles a soup. Dominic Armato, azcentral, 6 Dec. 2019 The twist, however, is the sauce — a rich, steaming hot broth twinged with tomato and a gentle chile buzz that more closely resembles a soup. Dominic Armato, azcentral, 6 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'twinge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of twinge

Noun

1608, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for twinge

Verb

Middle English twengen, from Old English twengan; akin to Old High German zwengen to pinch

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Time Traveler for twinge

Time Traveler

The first known use of twinge was before the 12th century

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Statistics for twinge

Last Updated

17 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Twinge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/twinge. Accessed 17 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for twinge

twinge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of twinge

: a sudden and usually slight pain
: a sudden slight feeling or emotion

twinge

noun
\ ˈtwinj How to pronounce twinge (audio) \

Kids Definition of twinge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a sudden sharp stab (as of pain or emotion) She felt a twinge of envy.

twinge

verb
twinged; twinging or twingeing

Kids Definition of twinge (Entry 2 of 2)

: to affect with or feel a sudden sharp pain or emotion

twinge

noun
\ ˈtwinj How to pronounce twinge (audio) \

Medical Definition of twinge

: a sudden sharp stab of pain

More from Merriam-Webster on twinge

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for twinge

Nglish: Translation of twinge for Spanish Speakers

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