twig

1 of 3

noun (1)

1
: a small shoot or branch usually without its leaves
2
: a minute branch of a nerve or artery
twigged adjective
twiggy adjective

twig

2 of 3

verb

twigged; twigging

transitive verb

1
2
: to understand the meaning of : comprehend

intransitive verb

: to gain a grasp : understand
twigged instinctively about thingsH. E. Bates

twig

3 of 3

noun (2)

British

Examples of twig in a Sentence

Verb He seemed confused until he twigged that something was going on. I had to explain it to him three times but he finally twigged.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
This bluejay appeared to be gathering twigs and materials to build a nest. Finian Curran/queens University News Service, Charlotte Observer, 9 May 2024 The American Horror Story posed for playful photos on the carpet with McCartney, as well as with Ed Sheeran and FKA twigs. Bailey Richards, Peoplemag, 7 May 2024 Lana Del Rey — Swift bestie who was at the Super Bowl with her — wearing a veil held up by twig horns. Lisa Gutierrez, Kansas City Star, 7 May 2024 One of my favorite artists to photograph was FKA twigs. Seth Dodson, Pitchfork, 6 May 2024 These insects can resemble stems or twigs and are typically pale green or light brown. Abigail Celaya, The Arizona Republic, 4 May 2024 In order to reproduce, female cicadas lay their eggs in small twigs or branches, using body parts called ovipositors to slit open these branches and deposit their eggs inside. Lily Carey, Discover Magazine, 2 May 2024 By Anna Gordon May 1, 2024 11:06 AM EDT British singer-songwriter FKA twigs, born Tahliah Debrett Barnett, testified before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property on Tuesday about the dangers of artificial intelligence. Anna Gordon, TIME, 1 May 2024 The company connected with her on Instagram last year after FKA twigs, who grew up training in a number of dance styles, including the Graham technique, shared one of its posts. Siobhan Burke, New York Times, 19 Apr. 2024
Verb
In hindsight, the impression is of an unwitting team effort, each inventor chipping away at the riddle of cinema without quite twigging its significance. Nat Segnit, Harper's Magazine, 4 Mar. 2022 The blades can handle branches and twigs up to 1 inch thick. Nor'adila Hepburn, Better Homes & Gardens, 16 May 2023 And the firms have started to twig that lofty statements and charity do not suffice. The Economist, 20 June 2020

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'twig.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English twigge, from Old English; akin to Old High German zwīg twig, Old English twā two

Verb

perhaps from Irish & Scottish Gaelic tuig- understand

Noun (2)

origin unknown

First Known Use

Noun (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1764, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun (2)

circa 1811, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of twig was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near twig

Cite this Entry

“Twig.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/twig. Accessed 26 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

twig

noun
ˈtwig
: a small shoot or branch usually without its leaves
twiggy
ˈtwig-ē
adjective

Medical Definition

twig

noun
: a minute branch of a nerve or artery
twigs of sensory nerves in the skinLynda Charters

More from Merriam-Webster on twig

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