tungsten

noun
tung·​sten | \ ˈtəŋ-stən How to pronounce tungsten (audio) \

Definition of tungsten

: a gray-white heavy high-melting ductile hard polyvalent metallic element that resembles chromium and molybdenum in many of its properties and is used especially in carbide materials and electrical components (such as lamp filaments) and in hardening alloys (such as steel) — see Chemical Elements Table

Examples of tungsten in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web To counter this, JET now has a special tungsten and beryllium shielding that will also be part of ITER. Caroline Delbert, Popular Mechanics, 16 Feb. 2022 The company allegedly certified that its tungsten was sourced in the U.S. when it was actually sourced in China. City News Service, San Diego Union-Tribune, 29 Apr. 2021 The Custom Shop also will offer more than 35 shotshell combinations loaded with Federal’s dense tungsten super shot (TSS) designed for turkey and waterfowl hunters. Field & Stream, 2 Oct. 2020 Winchester Long Beard delivered the extra yards, and at the price of lead, not tungsten. Phil Bourjaily, Field & Stream, 4 May 2020 Processors will strip out their coltan, gold, tin, and tungsten so they can be used in new equipment, thus reducing demand for new mining. National Geographic, 21 Apr. 2020 Porsche's solution, developed with Bosch, sprays a 0.004-inch tungsten-carbide coating onto iron discs, making them five times harder. Eric Tingwall, Car and Driver, 15 Apr. 2020 Incandescent The original electric light bulb as developed by Thomas Edison and his contemporaries in the mid-to-late 19th century, incandescent bulbs are made of glass with a gas like argon plus a tungsten filament inside. Stefanie Waldek, House Beautiful, 1 Apr. 2020 That great sink rate is due to the fly’s big tungsten bead head and the glassy coat of epoxy usually applied to it. Morgan Lyle, Field & Stream, 30 Mar. 2020 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tungsten.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of tungsten

1796, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for tungsten

Swedish, from tung heavy + sten stone

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Time Traveler for tungsten

Time Traveler

The first known use of tungsten was in 1796

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Dictionary Entries Near tungsten

tungstate

tungsten

tungsten bronze

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Cite this Entry

“Tungsten.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tungsten. Accessed 17 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for tungsten

tungsten

noun
tung·​sten | \ ˈtəŋ-stən How to pronounce tungsten (audio) \

Kids Definition of tungsten

: a grayish white hard metallic chemical element used especially for electrical parts (as for the fine wire in an electric light bulb) and to make alloys (as steel) harder

tungsten

noun
tung·​sten | \ ˈtəŋ-stən How to pronounce tungsten (audio) \

Medical Definition of tungsten

: a gray-white heavy high-melting ductile hard polyvalent metallic element that resembles chromium and molybdenum in many of its properties and is used especially for electrical purposes and in hardening alloys (as steel) symbol W

called also wolfram

— see Chemical Elements Table

More from Merriam-Webster on tungsten

Nglish: Translation of tungsten for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about tungsten

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