transpire

verb
tran·​spire | \ tran(t)-ˈspī(-ə)r How to pronounce transpire (audio) \
transpired; transpiring

Definition of transpire

intransitive verb

1 : to take place : go on, occur
2a : to become known or apparent : develop
b : to be revealed : come to light
3 : to give off vaporous material specifically : to give off or exude watery vapor especially from the surfaces of leaves
4 : to pass in the form of a vapor from a living body

transitive verb

: to pass off or give passage to (a fluid) through pores or interstices especially : to excrete (a fluid, such as water) in the form of a vapor through a living membrane (such as the skin)

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Can transpire mean 'to occur'?: Usage Guide

Sense 1 of transpire is the frequent whipping boy of those who suppose sense 2 to be the only meaning of the word. Sense 1 appears to have developed in the late 18th century; it was well enough known to have been used by Abigail Adams in a letter to her husband in 1775. there is nothing new transpired since I wrote you last — Abigail Adams Noah Webster recognized the new sense in his dictionary of 1828. Transpire was evidently a popular word with 19th century journalists; sense 1 turns up in such pretentiously worded statements as "The police drill will transpire under shelter to-day in consequence of the moist atmosphere prevailing." Around 1870 the sense began to be attacked as a misuse on the grounds of etymology, and modern critics echo the damnation of 1870. Sense 1 has been in existence for about two centuries; it is firmly established as standard; it occurs now primarily in serious prose, not the ostentatiously flamboyant prose typical of 19th century journalism.

Did You Know?

Transpire came to life in the late 16th century and was originally used in technical contexts to describe the passage of vapor through the pores of a membrane. From this technical use developed a figurative sense: to escape from secrecy, or to become known. That sense was often used in ambiguous contexts and could be taken to mean happen. (For example, Emily Dickinson wrote in a letter, I long to see you once more ... to tell you of many things which have transpired since we parted.) Thus the to take place sense developed. Around 1870, usage critics began to attack this sense as a misuse, and modern critics occasionally echo that sentiment. But the sense has been common for two centuries and today is found in serious and polished prose.

Examples of transpire in a Sentence

No one will soon forget the historic events that transpired on that day. A plant transpires more freely on a hot dry day. Trees transpire water at a rapid rate.
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Recent Examples on the Web

In addition, the story they were given about what transpired before his death sounds unlikely to those who loved him. Tanya A. Christian, Essence, "Mysterious Prison Death Leaves Family Searching For Answers A Year Later," 10 June 2019 And not only this season, but with this current dynasty, depending on what transpires next month in free agency. Matt Schneidman, The Mercury News, "Can Klay Thompson find that 2016 magic and keep the Warriors alive?," 7 June 2019 The thing that concerned me most was his nonchalant attitude about what transpired. Josephine Yurcaba, Teen Vogue, "Oklahoma Teen Allegedly Stabbed a Girl After She Romantically Rejected Him," 28 Aug. 2018 But then there is what has transpired for the last three days at T-Mobile Park, including Saturday night’s embarrassing 18-4 shellacking imposed on the Mariners by the Twins. Ryan Divish, The Seattle Times, "How low can they go? Mariners embarrassed by Minnesota in 18-4 shellacking," 19 May 2019 The recipient will then receive an invite, and all calls and messages that transpire within that conversation will be encrypted end-to-end until it is terminated. Dani Deahl, The Verge, "Skype now offers end-to-end encrypted conversations," 20 Aug. 2018 What's transpired since this announcement has been confusing, to say the least. Christopher Rosa, Glamour, "Here's Why Britney Spears Fans Are Posting #FreeBritney All Over Social Media," 23 Apr. 2019 All of this transpired right in front of the referee, who offered a yellow card to Simeone and sent off Becks. Jim Reineking, USA TODAY, "Craziest FIFA World Cup moments: Zinedine Zidane's headbutt, biggest upset, 'Hand of God'," 6 June 2018 Had the game happened 20 years later in the age of replay review, the play never would have transpired. Jr Radcliffe, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Twenty years after he played part in iconic NCAA moment, Glendale's Bill Jenkins still loves the annual reminders," 14 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'transpire.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of transpire

1597, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for transpire

Middle French transpirer, from Medieval Latin transpirare, from Latin trans- + spirare to breathe

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Statistics for transpire

Last Updated

23 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for transpire

The first known use of transpire was in 1597

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More Definitions for transpire

transpire

verb

English Language Learners Definition of transpire

formal : to happen
formal : to become known
technical, of a plant : to have water evaporate from the surface of leaves

transpire

verb
trans·​pire | \ trans-ˈpīr How to pronounce transpire (audio) \
transpired; transpiring

Kids Definition of transpire

1 : to come to pass : happen Important events transpired that day.
2 : to become known or apparent It transpired that they had met before.
3 : to give off water vapor through openings in the leaves

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