traitor

noun

trai·​tor ˈtrā-tər How to pronounce traitor (audio)
1
: one who betrays another's trust or is false to an obligation or duty
2
: one who commits treason

Examples of traitor in a Sentence

She has been called a traitor to the liberal party's cause. He was a traitor who betrayed his country by selling military secrets to the enemy.
Recent Examples on the Web Howard's name by exposing the real traitors framing him. Sydney Bucksbaum, EW.com, 6 June 2024 Wolfe positions Jelly as a race traitor, who denies his Black roots but whose music tells the full story of his origins. Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times, 4 June 2024 Any candidate who refuses to make such a pledge is a traitor to our form of government. Armstrong Williams, Baltimore Sun, 14 Apr. 2024 But as evidence of the miscarriage of justice gradually came to light — including the identity of the actual traitor, a dissolute nobleman named Ferdinand Walsin-Esterhazy — more people joined Dreyfus’ cause. Maurice Samuels / Made By History, TIME, 21 May 2024 See all Example Sentences for traitor 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'traitor.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English traytour, from Anglo-French traitre, from Latin traditor, from tradere to hand over, deliver, betray, from trans-, tra- trans- + dare to give — more at date

First Known Use

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of traitor was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near traitor

Cite this Entry

“Traitor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/traitor. Accessed 25 Jun. 2024.

Kids Definition

traitor

noun
trai·​tor ˈtrāt-ər How to pronounce traitor (audio)
1
: one who betrays another's trust or is false to an obligation or duty
2
: one who commits treason
Etymology

Middle English traitre "traitor," from early French traitre (same meaning), from Latin traditor (same meaning), derived from tradere "to hand over, betray" — related to treason see Word History at treason

More from Merriam-Webster on traitor

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