tolerate

verb
tol·​er·​ate | \ ˈtä-lə-ˌrāt How to pronounce tolerate (audio) \
tolerated; tolerating

Definition of tolerate

transitive verb

1a : to allow to be or to be done without prohibition, hindrance, or contradiction
b : to put up with learn to tolerate one another
2 : to endure or resist the action of (something, such as a drug or food) without serious side effects or discomfort : exhibit physiological tolerance for

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Other Words from tolerate

tolerative \ ˈtä-​lə-​ˌrā-​tiv How to pronounce tolerative (audio) \ adjective
tolerator \ ˈtä-​lə-​ˌrā-​tər How to pronounce tolerator (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for tolerate

Synonyms

allow, let, permit, suffer

Antonyms

bar, block, constrain, prevent

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Choose the Right Synonym for tolerate

bear, suffer, endure, abide, tolerate, stand mean to put up with something trying or painful. bear usually implies the power to sustain without flinching or breaking. forced to bear a tragic loss suffer often suggests acceptance or passivity rather than courage or patience in bearing. suffering many insults endure implies continuing firm or resolute through trials and difficulties. endured years of rejection abide suggests acceptance without resistance or protest. cannot abide their rudeness tolerate suggests overcoming or successfully controlling an impulse to resist, avoid, or resent something injurious or distasteful. refused to tolerate such treatment stand emphasizes even more strongly the ability to bear without discomposure or flinching. unable to stand teasing

Examples of tolerate in a Sentence

Our teacher will not tolerate bad grammar. Racist or sexist behavior will not be tolerated. I can't tolerate that noise. The government cannot tolerate lawlessness. How can you tolerate such laziness? These plants tolerate drought well. I don't like my boss, but I tolerate him.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Showing this, though, will require seriousness, discipline, and more risk than Democrats appear willing to tolerate right now. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "Democrats Are Losing This Made-for-TV Moment," 12 June 2019 Its members, male and female, have harnessed voices fed up with how domestic violence has been tolerated in this city. Elaine Ayala, ExpressNews.com, "Castro, Doggett announce town hall on domestic violence in San Antonio," 6 June 2019 In a later statement obtained by the L.A. Times, Hanna went on to say that this sentencing is proof that criminal acts fueled by racial hatred will not be tolerated any longer. Kynala Phillips, Essence, "Gang Member Who Targeted L.A. Black Families With Arson Sentenced To 13 Years," 4 June 2019 Trump has an old-fashioned view that allies especially should practice trade reciprocity, and that what would not be tolerated with an enemy should certainly not be indulged with a friend. Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "Is Germany Becoming Germany — Again?," 4 June 2019 How much violence can one tolerate while hoping to stop it by nonviolent means? Rony Brauman, Harper's magazine, "Salable Virtues," 10 Apr. 2019 Prosecutors last month told the magistrate Wilson must be jailed to send a message that such institutional cover-ups will no longer be tolerated. Rod Mcguirk, USA TODAY, "Australian bishop sentenced to year’s detention for child sex abuse cover-up," 2 July 2018 No sawdust carpeted the Safari's floor and no penny-ante players were tolerated there. Bill Savage, Chicago Reader, "Arts / Books / Booze / Food & Drink Can a Division Street cocktail bar truly capture the spirit of Nelson Algren?," 13 June 2018 Unless this court sets a precedent that this type of conduct will absolutely not be tolerated . . Maria Cramer, BostonGlobe.com, "SJC weighing the fate of judge implicated in courthouse sexual relationship," 24 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tolerate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tolerate

1524, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for tolerate

Latin toleratus, past participle of tolerare to endure, put up with; akin to Old English tholian to bear, Latin tollere to lift up, latus carried (suppletive past participle of ferre), Greek tlēnai to bear

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Statistics for tolerate

Last Updated

18 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for tolerate

The first known use of tolerate was in 1524

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More Definitions for tolerate

tolerate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of tolerate

: to allow (something that is bad, unpleasant, etc.) to exist, happen, or be done
: to experience (something harmful or unpleasant) without being harmed
: to accept the feelings, behavior, or beliefs of (someone)

tolerate

verb
tol·​er·​ate | \ ˈtä-lə-ˌrāt How to pronounce tolerate (audio) \
tolerated; tolerating

Kids Definition of tolerate

1 : to allow something to be or to be done without making a move to stop it Our teacher will tolerate a certain amount of giggling.
2 : to stand the action of These plants tolerate drought well.

tolerate

transitive verb
tol·​er·​ate | \ ˈtäl-ə-ˌrāt How to pronounce tolerate (audio) \
tolerated; tolerating

Medical Definition of tolerate

: to endure or resist the action of (as a drug or food) without serious side effects or discomfort : exhibit physiological tolerance for a premature baby…does not tolerate fats very well— H. R. Litchfield & L. H. Dembo

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More from Merriam-Webster on tolerate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with tolerate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tolerate

Spanish Central: Translation of tolerate

Nglish: Translation of tolerate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tolerate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on tolerate

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