terrace

noun
ter·​race | \ ˈter-əs How to pronounce terrace (audio) , ˈte-rəs \

Definition of terrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a relatively level paved or planted area adjoining a building
b : a colonnaded porch or promenade
c : a flat roof or open platform
2a : one of usually a series of horizontal ridges made in a hillside to increase cultivatable land, conserve moisture, or minimize erosion
b : a raised embankment with the top leveled
3 : a level ordinarily narrow plain usually with steep front bordering a river, lake, or sea also : a similar undersea feature
4a : a row of houses or apartments on raised ground or a sloping site
b : a group of row houses
c : a strip of park in the middle of a street often planted with trees or shrubs
d : street
5 : a section of a British soccer stadium set aside for standing spectators

terrace

verb
terraced; terracing

Definition of terrace (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to provide (something, such as a building or hillside) with a terrace
2 : to make into a terrace

Synonyms for terrace

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of terrace in a Sentence

Noun rice growing in hillside terraces For sale: large three-bedroom house with adjoining terrace and garden.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The hotel also recently opened is outdoor terrace and garden for dining. Erik Maza, Town & Country, 29 July 2022 Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors open to the pool terrace and views of the Gulf. New York Times, 27 July 2022 Right-field aluminum bleachers – ovens in the sun - were taken out; a tiki terrace and bar went in. Marc Bona, cleveland, 25 July 2022 The Horizon Lounge is a private area on the 22nd floor with a pool and terrace reserved for the guests in the top-level signature suites. Isabelle Kliger, Forbes, 19 July 2022 Outdoor spaces include a deck, a large terrace and a pavilion with a fireplace next to the pool. Kathy Orton, Washington Post, 8 July 2022 The main floor has a terrace and a wooden staircase leading to a second deck and access to Baker Beach. E.b. Solomont, WSJ, 16 May 2022 Harold’s terrace and downstairs taproom patio are great family-friendly spots to enjoy views of historic architecture, the Heights Theater and sunsets. Robin Soslow, Chron, 10 May 2022 As mentioned, guests also get an aperitif and three-course dinner on the rooftop terrace and top tier seats at the Moulin Rouge show, Féerie. Elizabeth Ayoola, Essence, 4 May 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb That said, Peak is worth the effort, and apparently is so seven days a week for those who come for the view from The Edge terrace a floor below, or the snazzy bar that stocks more than 200 spirits. John Mariani, Forbes, 6 July 2022 Another popular option is to terrace sections of the slope within your lawn to create flat planting areas. oregonlive, 3 July 2022 The end result is 40 hillside residences designed by EYRC architects that neatly terrace down from just below Sunset Boulevard (across a plaza from the fashionable Pendry West Hollywood hotel) to Franklin Avenue. Kathy A. Mcdonald, Variety, 21 Dec. 2021 Finally, one last floor up is the private rooftop deck, with its lap pool and terrace both enclosed by sliding glass and topped by a retractable sun awning for shade. Howard Walker, Robb Report, 7 Dec. 2021 But this is just the start of an upgrade to the 50-year-old venue that will expand and terrace its seating and improve entry points in hopes of making the small hillside bowl into a regional attraction in the sunny southeast corner of the city. Sam Whiting, San Francisco Chronicle, 4 Sep. 2021 Paths, fences, a pool, and terrace grace these picture-perfect grounds. courant.com, 14 May 2021 Paths, fences, a pool, and terrace grace these picture-perfect grounds. courant.com, 14 May 2021 Paths, fences, a pool, and terrace grace these picture-perfect grounds. courant.com, 14 May 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'terrace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of terrace

Noun

1515, in the meaning defined at sense 1b

Verb

1650, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for terrace

Noun

Middle French, platform, terrace, from Old French, from Old Occitan terrassa, from terra earth, from Latin, earth, land; akin to Latin torrēre to parch — more at thirst

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Time Traveler for terrace

Time Traveler

The first known use of terrace was in 1515

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Dictionary Entries Near terrace

terra cariosa

terrace

terraced house

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Statistics for terrace

Last Updated

6 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Terrace.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/terrace. Accessed 13 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for terrace

terrace

noun
ter·​race | \ ˈter-əs How to pronounce terrace (audio) \

Kids Definition of terrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a level area next to a building
2 : a raised piece of land with the top leveled Rice is planted in terraces on sides of the hill.
3 : a row of houses on raised ground or a slope

terrace

verb
terraced; terracing

Kids Definition of terrace (Entry 2 of 2)

: to form into a terrace or supply with terraces Rice growers terrace hillsides.

More from Merriam-Webster on terrace

Nglish: Translation of terrace for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of terrace for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about terrace

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