terrace

noun
ter·​race | \ ˈter-əs How to pronounce terrace (audio) , ˈte-rəs\

Definition of terrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a relatively level paved or planted area adjoining a building
b : a colonnaded porch or promenade
c : a flat roof or open platform
2a : one of usually a series of horizontal ridges made in a hillside to increase cultivatable land, conserve moisture, or minimize erosion
b : a raised embankment with the top leveled
3 : a level ordinarily narrow plain usually with steep front bordering a river, lake, or sea also : a similar undersea feature
4a : a row of houses or apartments on raised ground or a sloping site
b : a group of row houses
c : a strip of park in the middle of a street often planted with trees or shrubs
d : street
5 : a section of a British soccer stadium set aside for standing spectators

terrace

verb
terraced; terracing

Definition of terrace (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to provide (something, such as a building or hillside) with a terrace
2 : to make into a terrace

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Synonyms for terrace

Synonyms: Noun

balcony, deck, sundeck

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Examples of terrace in a Sentence

Noun

rice growing in hillside terraces For sale: large three-bedroom house with adjoining terrace and garden.

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The front units will come with terraces below the facade’s portico, where there are six huge columns. Carisa Crawford Chappell, chicagotribune.com, "As congregations shrink, Chicago churches see new life as homes, apartments and condos," 11 June 2019 One time, according to legend, the two were arguing on the terrace of his suite when a briefcase was thrown. Leena Kim, Town & Country, "The Scandalous Secret History of the Chateau Marmont," 24 May 2019 One side is protected by a sheer cliff, and the other is strategically fortified with defensive terraces. Nathaniel Scharping, Discover Magazine, "The Lost World of the Maya is Finally Emerging From the Jungle," 7 Feb. 2019 Staying There: Yves Peladeau rents out stylish wooden cottages, with wide terraces perched over the ocean in Santana, a 20-minute drive from São Tomé city (from about $70 a night on Airbnb, breakfast and dinner can be ordered separately). Gabriele Steinhauser, WSJ, "Fantasized About Being a Castaway? Check Out This Island Holiday," 18 Dec. 2018 Each of the units has floor-to ceiling windows and an outdoor terrace, as well as wood floors and 11.5-foot tall cement ceilings. Liz Stinson, Curbed, "Bjarke Ingels Group completes prefab affordable housing project in Denmark," 16 Oct. 2018 After the service, veterans of the negotiations gathered on the terrace of the King David Hotel, in Jerusalem, for an impromptu lunch. Adam Entous, The New Yorker, "Donald Trump’s New World Order," 11 June 2018 The fenced and gated home sits on a little over three-quarters of an acre with terraces, a fire pit, an outdoor shower and formal landscaping. Neal J. Leitereg, latimes.com, "Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham gets a landslide $19 million for Brentwood build," 18 Apr. 2018 The desert retreat consists of 34 suites, all of which come with terraces, fireplaces, and private courtyard entrances. Christina Liao, Vogue, "Emily Ratajkowski Retreated to This Desert Resort After Her Wedding," 9 Mar. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Around them was tranquil but functional farmland that was sensually subtropical, the fields terraced and piled with shocks of grain. Lawrence Osborne, Town & Country, "Why Everyone Is Traveling to Bhutan," 30 Mar. 2015 Beds of herbs, produce and flowers are terraced into the hillside, flanked by stone walls and bordered by open fields and a lush valley. BostonGlobe.com, "He planted a seed and an idea took root. The result is Red Barns at Kelly Way Gardens.," 19 Apr. 2018 For nearly a century, this had been dairy country, and the rounded, coastal hills were terraced from decades of grazing. Moises Velasquez-manoff, New York Times, "Can Dirt Save the Earth?," 18 Apr. 2018 Around 4,500 years ago, ancient engineers and workers terraced the little island in the Cyclades archipelago in the Aegean Sea, creating a sort of step pyramid. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Researchers Uncover Ancient Greek Island’s Complex Plumbing System," 22 Jan. 2018 For my 40th birthday my husband terraced a hillside on our Sonoma property and planted 400 rose bushes. Catherine Romano, WSJ, "14 Flowers Design Pros Hate—and the Ones They Recommend," 20 July 2017 Dynamics were harshly terraced with misjudged volume on brass entrances and lower-register string phrases that either got lost or assumed unnecessary prominence in unblended sound. Marcus Overton, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Mainly Mozart Festival Orchestra plays Mozart and Strauss without conductor," 16 June 2017 Excavated and terraced, the two courts are rimmed by seating for hundreds of spectators. Michael Kimmelman, New York Times, "Tennis, for Anyone? In the Bronx, the Answer Is Yes," 28 Apr. 2017 Around them was tranquil but functional farmland that was sensually subtropical, the fields terraced and piled with shocks of grain. Lawrence Osborne, Town & Country, "Why Everyone Is Traveling to Bhutan," 30 Mar. 2015

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'terrace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of terrace

Noun

1515, in the meaning defined at sense 1b

Verb

1650, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for terrace

Noun

Middle French, platform, terrace, from Old French, from Old Occitan terrassa, from terra earth, from Latin, earth, land; akin to Latin torrēre to parch — more at thirst

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Statistics for terrace

Last Updated

19 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for terrace

The first known use of terrace was in 1515

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More Definitions for terrace

terrace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of terrace

: a flat area created on the side of a hill and used especially for growing crops
: a flat area next to a building where people can sit and relax
British : a row of houses that are joined together : a group of row houses

terrace

noun
ter·​race | \ ˈter-əs How to pronounce terrace (audio) \

Kids Definition of terrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a level area next to a building
2 : a raised piece of land with the top leveled Rice is planted in terraces on sides of the hill.
3 : a row of houses on raised ground or a slope

terrace

verb
terraced; terracing

Kids Definition of terrace (Entry 2 of 2)

: to form into a terrace or supply with terraces Rice growers terrace hillsides.

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Comments on terrace

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