heiress

noun
heir·​ess | \ ˈer-əs How to pronounce heiress (audio) \

Definition of heiress

: a woman who is an heir especially to great wealth

Examples of heiress in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Indonesian phenom Iko Uwais team up to take down a group of mercenaries hired to kill a do-gooder billionaire heiress. Jordan Crucchiola, Vulture, "The 50 Best Action Movies on Netflix Right Now," 15 Jan. 2021 Even Kevin, the person who seems to be playing the everyman, is a model and influencer with a 12-pack whose Dior jackets are paid for by Russian-Japanese oil heiress Anna Shay. Deanna Pai, Glamour, "Netflix's Bling Empire Is a Dazzling Reality Show—But Not One I Can Identify With," 15 Jan. 2021 Hearst — a socialite, philanthropist and publishing heiress — is the daughter of former Hearst Chairman Randolph Apperson Hearst and the sister of Patty Hearst, who was kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army in the 1970s. Jack Flemming, Los Angeles Times, "Hearst heiress pays $10.72 million for Malibu beach house," 15 Dec. 2020 Here’s the plot of the souped up commercial: A young heiress is contending with the affections of a suitor handpicked by her mother. Shauna Stuart | Sstuart@al.com, al, "Lifetime KFC movie: No one asked for this steamy ‘Recipe for Seduction,’ but here it is," 8 Dec. 2020 The home was at one time owned by Peter Sprague, the former chairman of National Semiconductor and onetime co-owner of Aston Martin, and later by Jean Stein, the late media heiress and author. Katherine Clarke, WSJ, "The ‘Oprah of China’ Wants $28 Million for Manhattan Townhouse," 2 Dec. 2020 Andrew Jackson, who these days looks out quizzically from the back of every $10 bill, was born poor, married a rich heiress who smoked a corncob pipe, and died with 150 slaves, a 1,000-acre plantation and wealth equivalent to $133m. Matthew Sweet, The Economist, "The painter and the zebra-hunter: what presidents do after leaving office," 16 Nov. 2020 Shonda Rhimes created this limited series about New York City con artist Anna Delvey, who scammed her way into elite circles by posing as an heiress. Matthew Gilbert, BostonGlobe.com, "The ones to watch in 2021," 31 Dec. 2020 McCain was an oil heiress who was proud of her husband and sons’ Navy careers. Halley Bondy, NBC News, "Gone but not forgotten: 12 trailblazing women we lost in 2020," 28 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'heiress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of heiress

1607, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for heiress

heir entry 1 + -ess

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Time Traveler for heiress

Time Traveler

The first known use of heiress was in 1607

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Statistics for heiress

Last Updated

24 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Heiress.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heiress. Accessed 24 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for heiress

heiress

noun
How to pronounce heiress (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of heiress

: a girl or woman who is an heir especially : a girl or woman who inherits a large amount of money

heiress

noun
heir·​ess | \ ˈer-əs How to pronounce heiress (audio) \

Kids Definition of heiress

: a girl or a woman who is an heir

More from Merriam-Webster on heiress

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for heiress

Nglish: Translation of heiress for Spanish Speakers

Comments on heiress

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