tenure

noun
ten·​ure | \ ˈten-yər also -ˌyu̇r How to pronounce tenure (audio) \

Definition of tenure

1 : the act, right, manner, or term of holding something (such as a landed property, a position, or an office) especially : a status granted after a trial period to a teacher that gives protection from summary dismissal
2 : grasp, hold

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Other Words from tenure

tenurable \ ˈten-​yər-​ə-​bəl How to pronounce tenurable (audio) \ adjective
tenurial \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​əl How to pronounce tenurial (audio) \ adjective
tenurially \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​ə-​lē How to pronounce tenurially (audio) \ adverb

Synonyms for tenure

Synonyms

hitch, stint, term, tour

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Examples of tenure in a Sentence

… but there is also about it just the trace of the nettlesome righteousness that alienated much of Washington during his tenure there, the not-so-subtle suggestion that while he might be in politics, he is not of politics and certainly not, God_forbid, a politician. — Jim Wooten, New York Times Magazine, 29 Jan. 1995 Pittsburgh's offensive linemen, trap blockers during Noll's tenure, had to bulk up for the straight-ahead game. — Paul Zimmerman, Sports Illustrated, 9 Nov. 1992 A mural on the upper half of a four-story guesthouse was painted in 1977 by twelve-year-old schoolchildren, whose tenure on the scaffold must have thrilled their parents. — John McPhee, New Yorker, 22 Feb. 1988 During his tenure as head coach, the team won the championship twice. her 12-year tenure with the company His tenure in office will end with the next election. After seven years I was finally granted tenure. He hopes to get tenure next year. The defendant did not have tenure on the land. land tenure in Anglo-Saxon Britain
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Recent Examples on the Web

District Superintendent Kate Donegan said O’Brien has taught three generations of the same family in his tenure. Steve Sadin, chicagotribune.com, "Skokie teacher retiring after 60 years with the same district: 'To me, it wasn’t work'," 4 June 2019 Her first detainment ended seven years into her 35-year prison sentence, when Barack Obama commuted her sentence with just three days left in his tenure as president. Lucy Diavolo, Teen Vogue, "Chelsea Manning Has Been Imprisoned for Resisting a Grand Jury Investigation. Here’s Why She Should Be Freed," 11 Mar. 2019 Early in his tenure, President Lyndon Johnson focused on championing the causes of the late John F. Kennedy. Patrick Sisson, Curbed, "Public transit’s missed opportunity," 20 Nov. 2018 Carlos Waters Why did New York City’s Department of Transportation focus on protected bike lanes in your tenure? Carlos Waters, Vox, "How Janette Sadik-Khan built New York City’s bicycle renaissance," 12 Sep. 2018 In his tenure, which began in 2011, the secondary has not featured the same players in consecutive seasons. Jourdan Rodrigue, charlotteobserver, "Most exciting position battle at Panthers' 2018 training camp fueled by competition," 11 July 2018 Hextall strikes Van Riemsdyk becomes the first significant free agent signed by Hextall in his tenure. Sam Carchidi, Philly.com, "Flyers' James van Riemsdyk signing brings back memories of Danny Briere," 6 July 2018 Now, Fred Glass — the athletic director who has overseen Indiana’s rise from Big Ten also-ran to Midwest power — must hire a second coach in his tenure. Zach Osterman, Indianapolis Star, "Insider: IU baseball can take final step with Chris Lemonis successor," 25 June 2018 In her tenure, Pablo has worked with recording artists in multiple genres through album releases, awards shows, concert tours and crisis management. Justino Aguila, Billboard, "TV Vet Clara Pablo Joins Walter Kolm Entertainment as SVP Marketing," 21 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tenure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tenure

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for tenure

Middle English, "possession of land under obligation to a superior, the land so held," borrowed from Anglo-French tenure, teneure, going back to Gallo-Romance *tenitūra "act of possessing," from Latin ten-, base of tenēre "to hold, possess" + -it-, generalized from past participles ending in -itus + -ūra -ure — more at tenant entry 1

Note: A number of renderings of the word in Medieval Latin from the 11th century on (as tenetura, tenatura, tentura, tenura, etc.) may reflect stages in the passage from Latin to French or attempts to Latinize a vernacular form.

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Statistics for tenure

Last Updated

9 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for tenure

The first known use of tenure was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for tenure

tenure

noun

English Language Learners Definition of tenure

: the amount of time that a person holds a job, office, or title
: the right to keep a job (especially the job of being a professor at a college or university) for as long as you want to have it
law : the right to use property

tenure

noun
ten·​ure | \ ˈten-yər How to pronounce tenure (audio) \

Legal Definition of tenure

1 : the act, manner, duration, or right of holding something tenure of office specifically : the manner of holding real property : the title and conditions by which property is held freehold tenure
2 : a status granted to a teacher usually after a probationary period that protects him or her from dismissal except for reasons of incompetence, gross misconduct, or financial necessity

Other Words from tenure

tenurial \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​əl How to pronounce tenurial (audio) \ adjective
tenurially \ -​ə-​lē How to pronounce tenurially (audio) \ adverb

History and Etymology for tenure

Anglo-French, feudal holding, from Old French teneüre, from Medieval Latin tenitura, ultimately from Latin tenēre to hold

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More from Merriam-Webster on tenure

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with tenure

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tenure

Spanish Central: Translation of tenure

Nglish: Translation of tenure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tenure for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about tenure

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