tenure

noun
ten·​ure | \ ˈten-yər How to pronounce tenure (audio) also -ˌyu̇r \

Definition of tenure

1 : the act, right, manner, or term of holding something (such as a landed property, a position, or an office) especially : a status granted after a trial period to a teacher that gives protection from summary dismissal
2 : grasp, hold

Other Words from tenure

tenurable \ ˈten-​yər-​ə-​bəl How to pronounce tenure (audio) \ adjective
tenurial \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​əl How to pronounce tenure (audio) \ adjective
tenurially \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​ə-​lē How to pronounce tenure (audio) \ adverb

Synonyms for tenure

Synonyms

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Examples of tenure in a Sentence

… but there is also about it just the trace of the nettlesome righteousness that alienated much of Washington during his tenure there, the not-so-subtle suggestion that while he might be in politics, he is not of politics and certainly not, God forbid, a politician. — Jim Wooten, New York Times Magazine, 29 Jan. 1995 Pittsburgh's offensive linemen, trap blockers during Noll's tenure, had to bulk up for the straight-ahead game. — Paul Zimmerman, Sports Illustrated, 9 Nov. 1992 A mural on the upper half of a four-story guesthouse was painted in 1977 by twelve-year-old schoolchildren, whose tenure on the scaffold must have thrilled their parents. — John McPhee, New Yorker, 22 Feb. 1988 During his tenure as head coach, the team won the championship twice. her 12-year tenure with the company His tenure in office will end with the next election. After seven years I was finally granted tenure. He hopes to get tenure next year. The defendant did not have tenure on the land. land tenure in Anglo-Saxon Britain See More
Recent Examples on the Web The biggest decision of Steve Yzerman’s tenure as general manager of the Detroit Red Wings is looming. Carlos Monarrez, Detroit Free Press, 4 May 2022 Of the 21 unfilled lines, 12 were on the tenure track. Michael T. Nietzel, Forbes, 4 May 2022 The payout is striking for a leader whose recent tenure has been marked by employee complaints over sexism, a hostile work culture and mismanagement of assault claims. Scott Carpenter, Fortune, 3 May 2022 Just days into Gascón’s tenure, the former head prosecutor in the Compton courthouse, Richard Doyle, was demoted after refusing to dismiss a case on Gascón’s orders. James Queally, Los Angeles Times, 3 May 2022 Last May, the board of trustees at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, amid a stream of conservative criticism of the 1619 Project, denied tenure to the journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, who had created the original project at the Times. Jelani Cobb, The New Yorker, 2 May 2022 And Thibodeaux’s journey promises to be especially entertaining and impactful on how Schoen’s tenure ultimately shakes out. Tribune News Service, oregonlive, 30 Apr. 2022 Hill offers more versatility and upside than any defensive player the Bengals have drafted during Anarumo’s tenure with the team. Charlie Goldsmith, The Enquirer, 29 Apr. 2022 In mid-2019, months into Bolsonaro’s tenure, federal and some state governments sharply restricted access to the records. Washington Post, 29 Apr. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tenure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of tenure

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for tenure

Middle English, "possession of land under obligation to a superior, the land so held," borrowed from Anglo-French tenure, teneure, going back to Gallo-Romance *tenitūra "act of possessing," from Latin ten-, base of tenēre "to hold, possess" + -it-, generalized from past participles ending in -itus + -ūra -ure — more at tenant entry 1

Note: A number of renderings of the word in Medieval Latin from the 11th century on (as tenetura, tenatura, tentura, tenura, etc.) may reflect stages in the passage from Latin to French or attempts to Latinize a vernacular form.

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Time Traveler for tenure

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The first known use of tenure was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near tenure

tenuous

tenure

tenure by free alms

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Statistics for tenure

Last Updated

6 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Tenure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tenure. Accessed 16 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for tenure

tenure

noun
ten·​ure | \ ˈten-yər How to pronounce tenure (audio) \

Legal Definition of tenure

1 : the act, manner, duration, or right of holding something tenure of office specifically : the manner of holding real property : the title and conditions by which property is held freehold tenure
2 : a status granted to a teacher usually after a probationary period that protects him or her from dismissal except for reasons of incompetence, gross misconduct, or financial necessity

Other Words from tenure

tenurial \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​əl How to pronounce tenure (audio) \ adjective
tenurially \ -​ə-​lē How to pronounce tenure (audio) \ adverb

History and Etymology for tenure

Anglo-French, feudal holding, from Old French teneüre, from Medieval Latin tenitura, ultimately from Latin tenēre to hold

More from Merriam-Webster on tenure

Nglish: Translation of tenure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tenure for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about tenure

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