tedious

adjective
te·dious | \ ˈtē-dē-əs , ˈtē-jəs \

Definition of tedious 

: tiresome because of length or dullness : boring a tedious public ceremony

Keep scrolling for more

Other words from tedious

tediously adverb
tediousness noun

The Long and Uneventful History of tedious

Words frequently change their meanings, and some even will go from meaning one thing to meaning something almost opposite (such as nice, which in its earliest use meant "lewd, wanton, dissolute"). Tedious is not one of these words; its meanings may have shifted over the centuries, but they have always had something to do with irksome, boring, or overlong things. The word comes from the Latin taedēre, meaning “to disgust or weary.” Tedious has been in use since the 15th century and has been included in hundreds of dictionaries, although perhaps none have rendered so poetic and succinct a definition as Nathaniel Bailey’s entry in his 1756 New Universal Etymological English Dictionary: “Wearisome by continuance.”

Examples of tedious in a Sentence

Writing a new spreadsheet or word-processing program these days is a tedious process, like building a skyscraper out of toothpicks. —Jeff Goodell, Rolling Stone, 16 June 1994 Another of their assignments was to slow-fly any plane that had a new engine to break it in; that meant flying the aircraft for a tedious hour-and-a-half as slowly as it would possibly go without falling out of the sky. —Doris Weatherford, American Women and World War II, 1990 From there, it became clear that the deposition was going to be neither as undramatic nor as quotidian, and even tedious, as it at first appeared. —Renata Adler, New Yorker, June 23, 1986 He made a tedious 45-minute speech. The work is tedious, but it needs to get done.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web

But a big part of it are the little exercises, the tedious things, and the repetition. Tim Ferriss, Outside Online, "Maria Sharapova on Training and Mental Performance," 14 May 2018 Natalia Cornelio, the criminal justice reform program director at nonprofit Texas Civil Rights Project, said the process is tedious, involving multiple calls to get confirmation that a child is in government care and to locate a case manager. Louise Radnofsky, WSJ, "Separations of Migrant Families Stopped a Week Ago, but Reunifications Have Barely Begun," 27 June 2018 Then they were instructed to complete an intentionally tedious task on the computer, sorting bright circles that were annoying to look at. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Being Hangry is Real, But You Can Control It," 13 June 2018 The result is tedious and makes this short play feel very long and repetitious. Toby Zinman, Philly.com, "'Red Bike' by Simpatico Theatre: Dreary outlook, tedious play," 11 June 2018 Eva isn’t the only artificial intelligence product looking to infiltrate office spaces to perform tedious tasks, like scheduling meetings or telling the IT department that a printer isn’t working. Trisha Thadani, San Francisco Chronicle, "Startups in the spotlight: Voicera, Stripe and Aerones," 19 Mar. 2018 Eakin envisions underwater drones doing the tedious work of planting tens of thousands of pieces of coral on reefs, and robots taking over the job of cutting the microfragments that scientists now saw one by one. Evan Halper, latimes.com, "Racing to save Florida’s coral from climate change, scientists turn to a once-unthinkable strategy: ‘assisted evolution’," 9 July 2018 Salad Chopper and Bowl Despite the best intentions to slice that leftover chicken breast or salmon on a lovely bed of greens for lunch tomorrow, chopping greens and vegetables can be tedious work. Cathy Deimeke, USA TODAY, "Ask a Doc: What can I do to make healthy eating fun and easy for my kids?," 4 July 2018 The boring, tedious grunt work of campaigning will stretch for three and a half more hours until the election watch party. Rachel Becker, The Verge, "How a volcano scientist set out to change American politics," 7 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tedious.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of tedious

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for tedious

Middle English, from Late Latin taediosus, from Latin taedium — see tedium

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about tedious

Dictionary Entries near tedious

Te Deum laudamus

tedge

tediosity

tedious

tediousome

tedium

tee

Statistics for tedious

Last Updated

18 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for tedious

The first known use of tedious was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for tedious

tedious

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of tedious

: boring and too slow or long

tedious

adjective
te·dious | \ ˈtē-dē-əs , ˈtē-jəs \

Kids Definition of tedious

: tiring because of length or dullness a tedious explanation a tedious job

Other words from tedious

tediously adverb
tediousness noun

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on tedious

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tedious

Spanish Central: Translation of tedious

Nglish: Translation of tedious for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tedious for Arabic Speakers

Comments on tedious

What made you want to look up tedious? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

occurring twice a year or every two years

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Food Quiz

Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!