tedious

adjective
te·​dious | \ ˈtē-dē-əs How to pronounce tedious (audio) , ˈtē-jəs\

Definition of tedious

: tiresome because of length or dullness : boring a tedious public ceremony

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Other Words from tedious

tediously adverb
tediousness noun

The Long and Uneventful History of Tedious

Words frequently change their meanings, and some even will go from meaning one thing to meaning something almost opposite (such as nice, which in its earliest use meant "lewd, wanton, dissolute"). Tedious is not one of these words; its meanings may have shifted over the centuries, but they have always had something to do with irksome, boring, or overlong things. The word comes from the Latin taedēre, meaning “to disgust or weary.” Tedious has been in use since the 15th century and has been included in hundreds of dictionaries, although perhaps none have rendered so poetic and succinct a definition as Nathaniel Bailey’s entry in his 1756 New Universal Etymological English Dictionary: “Wearisome by continuance.”

Examples of tedious in a Sentence

Writing a new spreadsheet or word-processing program these days is a tedious process, like building a skyscraper out of toothpicks. — Jeff Goodell, Rolling Stone, 16 June 1994 Another of their assignments was to slow-fly any plane that had a new engine to break it in; that meant flying the aircraft for a tedious hour-and-a-half as slowly as it would possibly go without falling out of the sky. — Doris Weatherford, American Women and World War II, 1990 From there, it became clear that the deposition was going to be neither as undramatic nor as quotidian, and even tedious, as it at first appeared. — Renata Adler, New Yorker, June 23, 1986 He made a tedious 45-minute speech. The work is tedious, but it needs to get done.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Using a food processor is like having your own personal sous chef — owning one will save you from having to do tons of tedious and tiring prep work. Betty Gold, Good Housekeeping, "The 7 Best Food Processors to Buy, According to Kitchen Appliance Experts," 1 Feb. 2019 That hasn’t changed, especially as regards the tedious, spattery quest of the Man in Black (Ed Harris in the present, Jimmi Simpson in flashbacks). James Poniewozik, New York Times, "Review: ‘Westworld’ Gets a Partial Upgrade for Season 2," 18 Apr. 2018 This kind of bureaucratic consensus-building tends to be slow and tedious, which is why entrepreneurial-minded people like Elon Musk hate doing it. Timothy B. Lee, Ars Technica, "Tesla is outgrowing Elon Musk," 29 Sep. 2018 Always on the go, Mai eschews a tedious number of steps in favor of the bare minimum to keep her skin glowing and curls luminous. Lauren Valenti, Vogue, "Watch Ella Mai’s Five-Minute Guide to Sensitive Skin Care," 6 Feb. 2019 What to Expect: Be warned, this is a long and tedious process. Fresh U, Teen Vogue, "9 Stages of Applying to College as a High School Senior," 11 Sep. 2018 Machine learning engineers who work on automating jobs in other fields often observe, humorously, that in some respects, their own field looks like one where much of the work — the tedious tuning of parameters — could be automated. Kelsey Piper, Vox, "The case for taking AI seriously as a threat to humanity," 21 Dec. 2018 The most tedious part of this was making the pom-poms. Danielle Tullo, House Beautiful, "Stop What You're Doing And Make These Pom-Pom Pillows," 2 Nov. 2018 The work on these platforms is often menial and tedious, and the survey found that workers get paid startlingly little on all five platforms, especially when unpaid work is taken into account. Megan Geuss, Ars Technica, "Low pay, poor prospects, and psychological toll: The perils of microtask work," 23 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tedious.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tedious

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for tedious

Middle English, from Late Latin taediosus, from Latin taedium — see tedium

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Learn More about tedious

Dictionary Entries near tedious

Te Deum laudamus

tedge

tediosity

tedious

tediousome

tedium

tee

Statistics for tedious

Last Updated

3 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for tedious

The first known use of tedious was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for tedious

tedious

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of tedious

: boring and too slow or long

tedious

adjective
te·​dious | \ ˈtē-dē-əs How to pronounce tedious (audio) , ˈtē-jəs\

Kids Definition of tedious

: tiring because of length or dullness a tedious explanation a tedious job

Other Words from tedious

tediously adverb
tediousness noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on tedious

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tedious

Spanish Central: Translation of tedious

Nglish: Translation of tedious for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tedious for Arabic Speakers

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