take a lot out of (someone)

idiom (1)

Definition of take a lot out of (someone)

 (Entry 1 of 16)

: to require a lot of work or energy and cause someone to feel physically or emotionally tired That interview really took a lot out of me.

take it out of (someone)

idiom (2)

Definition of take it out of (someone) (Entry 2 of 16)

British
: to require a lot of work or energy and cause someone to feel physically or emotionally tired That interview really took it out of me.

take leave of (someone)

idiom (3)

Definition of take leave of (someone) (Entry 3 of 16)

formal
: to say goodbye to (someone) and depart It was late when they finally took leave of their friends and headed home.

take (someone) aside

idiom (4)

Definition of take (someone) aside (Entry 4 of 16)

: to take (someone) to a place that is away from other people I took him aside and told him what had happened.

take (someone) by surprise

idiom (5)

Definition of take (someone) by surprise (Entry 5 of 16)

: to surprise (someone) Her reaction took me by surprise.

take (someone) in/into one's arms

idiom (6)

Definition of take (someone) in/into one's arms (Entry 6 of 16)

: to embrace (someone) : hug (someone) He took her in/into his arms and kissed her passionately.

take (someone or something) seriously

idiom (7)

Definition of take (someone or something) seriously (Entry 7 of 16)

: to treat (someone or something) as being very important and deserving attention or respect He takes his religious faith seriously. She's well qualified for the job, so she hopes the company will take her seriously. His parents threatened to punish him, but he didn't take them seriously, since he had not been punished before. Most politicians take themselves too seriously.

take (someone) prisoner

idiom (8)

Definition of take (someone) prisoner (Entry 8 of 16)

: to capture and make (someone) one's prisoner They took him prisoner. The pilot was shot down and taken prisoner.

take (someone) through

idiom (9)

Definition of take (someone) through (Entry 9 of 16)

: to tell (someone) how (something) happens or is done by explaining the details of each step I asked him to take me through his daily exercise regimen.

take (someone) unawares

idiom (10)

Definition of take (someone) unawares (Entry 10 of 16)

: to surprise (someone) by something unexpected She was taken unawares by the sudden change in plans.

take (someone) under one's wing

idiom (11)

Definition of take (someone) under one's wing (Entry 11 of 16)

: to help, teach, or take care of (someone who is younger or has less experience) He took the rookie pitcher under his wing.

take (something) out on (someone)

phrasal verb
took (something) out on (someone); taken (something) out on (someone); taking (something) out on (someone); takes (something) out on (someone)

Definition of take (something) out on (someone) (Entry 12 of 16)

: to treat someone badly because one feels angry, frustrated, etc. workers who go home and take out their frustration on their families I'm sorry you didn't get the job, but don't take it out on me.

take the place of (someone or something)

idiom (12)

Definition of take the place of (someone or something) (Entry 13 of 16)

: to replace (someone or something) Who will take the place of the current pope? Televisions began to take the place of radios in most families' homes.

take the side of (someone)

idiom (13)

Definition of take the side of (someone) (Entry 14 of 16)

: to agree with or support (one person or group) and not another The government responded by taking the side of the consumer.

take the starch out of (someone)

idiom (14)

Definition of take the starch out of (someone) (Entry 15 of 16)

US, informal + old-fashioned
: to make (someone) weak or unsure : to cause (someone) to lose energy or confidence When he lost the second game, it seemed to take the starch out of him.

take to (something or someone) like a duck (takes) to water

idiom (15)

Definition of take to (something or someone) like a duck (takes) to water (Entry 16 of 16)

informal
: to learn (do something) very quickly or easily : to like (something or someone) immediately She took to dancing like a duck (takes) to water. He took to her like a duck to water.

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