suction

noun
suc·​tion | \ ˈsək-shən How to pronounce suction (audio) \

Definition of suction

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act or process of sucking
2a : the act or process of exerting a force upon a solid, liquid, or gaseous body by reason of reduced air pressure over part of its surface
b : force so exerted
3 : a device (such as a pipe or fitting) used in a machine that operates by suction

suction

verb
suctioned; suctioning; suctions

Definition of suction (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to remove (as from a body cavity or passage) by suction

Other Words from suction

Noun

suctional \ ˈsək-​shə-​nᵊl How to pronounce suction (audio) , -​shnəl \ adjective

Examples of suction in a Sentence

Noun The vacuum cleaner picks up dirt by suction. The octopus grasps things using suction. a vacuum cleaner with enough suction to pick up the heaviest particles of dirt Verb The surgeon will suction blood out of the area.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The robot vacuum cleaner boasts up to 1,800 pascals of strong suction power, picking up pet hair, dirt, dust, and crumbs with ease. Amy Schulman, PEOPLE.com, 18 Nov. 2021 But what impressed our testers the most was its suction power. Erin Johnson, Better Homes & Gardens, 3 Nov. 2021 Fans are used on spacecraft toilets to create suction and control the flow of urine because, in the microgravity environment of space, waste can — and does — go in every possible direction. Jackie Wattles, CNN, 1 Nov. 2021 Many commercially available dent pullers use suction to restore a car body to its original form. Jeff Harper, chicagotribune.com, 11 Mar. 2021 With a powerful suction and several attachments to use, this is a great (and affordable) option, on sale at Macy's now. Felicity Warner, USA TODAY, 22 June 2021 For infants, Riley recommends that parents help remove secretions from the nose with a bulb suction that is typically used at a hospital right after birth. Marisol Chávez, Dallas News, 17 June 2021 Liberty High School coaches had instructed swimmers to cover the pool with heavy covers that create suction when rolled onto water, the lawsuit said. oregonlive, 7 Oct. 2021 This vacuum has four times more suction power than any other BLACK + DECKER handheld vacuum. Chris Hachey, BGR, 4 Oct. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Raymond taught the Phanatic what became his signature moves: how to whomp his paunch, how to suction a plunger to the head of a bald man, how to stand at a distance and land rings on the plunger. New York Times, 6 Aug. 2021 At the Nevada hospital, an interventional radiologist passed a tube through blood vessels and on into the young woman’s brain and used a device to suction out the blood clots. New York Times, 16 Apr. 2021 Doctors performed a procedure to suction huge clots from her brain, only to find that new ones had formed. New York Times, 16 Apr. 2021 Geotubes will be used to suction contaminated sediments from the river bottom. Susannah Bryan, sun-sentinel.com, 21 Oct. 2020 Smart robot vacuum cleaners do an excellent job of avoiding that, working to suction up dirt without having to lift a finger. Melissa Lee, USA TODAY, 1 June 2020 Inside the doors of the gym, risk is elevated, and so too is the debate over whether to wear a mask that could suction to the nose and mouth, as Victoria Williams' cloth covering did. Carly Mallenbaum, USA TODAY, 11 June 2020 This smart vac offers solid suctioning power and was remarkably easy to set up, which was why our testers enjoyed it. Shayna Murphy, USA TODAY, 28 Feb. 2020 Eye-Vac stationary vacuum: Sweep debris to the always-on infrared sensors at the base of the vacuum and the debris will be automatically suctioned into the easy-to-dump canister. oregonlive, 31 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'suction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of suction

Noun

1626, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1954, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for suction

Noun

Late Latin suction-, suctio, from Latin sugere to suck — more at suck

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Time Traveler for suction

Time Traveler

The first known use of suction was in 1626

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Dictionary Entries Near suction

sucrose

suction

suction anemometer

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Statistics for suction

Last Updated

21 Nov 2021

Cite this Entry

“Suction.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/suction. Accessed 2 Dec. 2021.

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More Definitions for suction

suction

noun

English Language Learners Definition of suction

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act or process of removing the air, water, etc., from a space in order to pull something into that space or in order to cause something to stick to a surface also : the force with which the air, water, etc., in a space is removed

suction

verb

English Language Learners Definition of suction (Entry 2 of 2)

: to remove (something) by pulling it with the force of moving water, air, etc. : to remove (something) by using suction

suction

noun
suc·​tion | \ ˈsək-shən How to pronounce suction (audio) \

Kids Definition of suction

1 : the act or process of sucking
2 : the process of drawing something into a space (as in a pump) by removing air from the space
3 : the force caused by suction The vacuum cleaner has strong suction.

suction

noun
suc·​tion | \ ˈsək-shən How to pronounce suction (audio) \

Medical Definition of suction

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act or process of sucking
2a : the act or process of exerting a force upon a solid, liquid, or gaseous body by reason of reduced air pressure over part of its surface
b : force so exerted
3 : the act or process of removing secretions or fluids from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device (as a suction pump) that operates on negative pressure

suction

transitive verb

Medical Definition of suction (Entry 2 of 2)

: to remove from a body cavity or passage by suction

More from Merriam-Webster on suction

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for suction

Nglish: Translation of suction for Spanish Speakers

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