suction

noun
suc·tion | \ˈsək-shən \

Definition of suction 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act or process of sucking

2a : the act or process of exerting a force upon a solid, liquid, or gaseous body by reason of reduced air pressure over part of its surface

b : force so exerted

3 : a device (such as a pipe or fitting) used in a machine that operates by suction

suction

verb
suctioned; suctioning; suctions

Definition of suction (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to remove (as from a body cavity or passage) by suction

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Other Words from suction

Noun

suctional \ˈsək-shə-nᵊl, -shnəl \ adjective

Examples of suction in a Sentence

Noun

The vacuum cleaner picks up dirt by suction. The octopus grasps things using suction. a vacuum cleaner with enough suction to pick up the heaviest particles of dirt

Verb

The surgeon will suction blood out of the area.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Swapping them out a little earlier and regularly cleaning the canisters and filters will improve your machine's suction, big-time. Caroline Picard, Good Housekeeping, "Test Your Housekeeping Knowledge: How Gross Are Your Cleaning Habits?," 10 July 2018 The latest robot vacuum to join the family is the RoboVac 30, which has 15% stronger suction than the RoboVac 11S. Samantha Gordon, USA TODAY, "These are the 5 best Amazon deals right now," 5 July 2018 Booth was struck by the possibility of the inverse method: suction to remove the dirt. Casey Quackenbush, Time, "Google Doodle Honors the Inventor of the First Powered Vacuum Cleaner Hubert Cecil Booth," 5 July 2018 The crew of the EV Nautilus used underwater robots equipped with a suction tube to slurp up samples of sediment. Sandi Doughton, The Seattle Times, "Meteorite search off the Washington coast recovers two small fragments," 3 July 2018 The surgeon first uses a suction ring to flatten the eye in order to cut a flap in the cornea, folding the flap back to reveal the middle section, called the stroma. New York Times, "Blurred Vision, Burning Eyes: This Is a Lasik Success?," 11 June 2018 Practitioners create a vacuum inside a bulbous glass jar and suction it to the skin to draw blood to the surface. Emily Rekstis, SELF, "I Tried At-Home Facial Cupping," 9 Jan. 2018 The surgeon first uses a suction ring to flatten the eye in order to cut a flap in the cornea, folding back the flap back to reveal the middle section, called the stroma. Author: Roni Caryn Rabin, Anchorage Daily News, "Blurred vision, burning eyes: This is a Lasik success?," 12 June 2018 The jarring sound of a suction machine, which Spencer used to ensure Kenan did not choke on his own saliva, became the background noise of their lives. Patricia Callahan, chicagotribune.com, "7-year-old Kenan, who helped spark a lifesaving change in state procedures, dies from Krabbe disease," 1 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Young suctioned out birth debris from the baby's mouth and everybody rubbed her with hands and towels to trigger breathing. Jane Ford-stewart, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Baby born practically in front yard of Greenfield home on Memorial Day," 5 June 2018 From suctioning grime and makeup out of your pores to infusing your skin with antioxidants, there's a solution for every skin complaint out there. Deanna Pai, Glamour, "15 Great Sheet Masks, So Cheap You Can Buy Them All," 12 Apr. 2018 It can be done with heat by lighting flammable liquid in a glass cup and suctioning that to the back once the flame goes out, with the decrease in temperature creating the suction. Alysha Tsuji, For The Win, "Bryce Harper shared a crazy photo of his cupping therapy," 25 Jan. 2018 Many novelists are called Dickensian, but Adiga comes closer than most, albeit with every last speck of Victorian sentimentality suctioned out. Laura Miller, Slate Magazine, "Some Boys Rise, Some Boys Fall," 9 Jan. 2017 In ultrasonic liposuction, surgeons first inject fluid into the fat deposits to help transmit the probe’s ultrasonic energy into the fat, breaking it down so it can be easily suctioned out. Mark E. Bruley, Philly.com, "Medical Mystery: An unexpected outcome from liposuction," 23 June 2017 Rather than grabbing onto the coral, the fish appear to create a seal with their mouths over a small area, presumably to more efficiently suction off coral mucus and flesh. National Geographic, "Why Slimy Fish Lips Are the Secret to Eating Stinging Coral," 5 June 2017 The operation was an experiment: On a hunch, the surgeon suctioned out two trenches of tissue from the man’s brain, one from each of his medial temporal lobes, located deep below the skull about level with the ears. Benedict Carey, New York Times, "Brenda Milner, Eminent Brain Scientist, Is ‘Still Nosy’ at 98," 15 May 2017 The ezpz Happy Mat suctions right to the table, and its super-tight seal guarantees less of a mess (no more flipped plates!). Katina Beniaris, Woman's Day, "This Genius Placemat Is a Mealtime Game Changer If You Have Kids," 28 Mar. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'suction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of suction

Noun

1626, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1954, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for suction

Noun

Late Latin suction-, suctio, from Latin sugere to suck — more at suck

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Statistics for suction

Last Updated

20 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for suction

The first known use of suction was in 1626

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More Definitions for suction

suction

noun

English Language Learners Definition of suction

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act or process of removing the air, water, etc., from a space in order to pull something into that space or in order to cause something to stick to a surface; also : the force with which the air, water, etc., in a space is removed

suction

verb

English Language Learners Definition of suction (Entry 2 of 2)

: to remove (something) by pulling it with the force of moving water, air, etc. : to remove (something) by using suction

suction

noun
suc·tion | \ˈsək-shən \

Kids Definition of suction

1 : the act or process of sucking

2 : the process of drawing something into a space (as in a pump) by removing air from the space

3 : the force caused by suction The vacuum cleaner has strong suction.

suction

noun
suc·tion | \ˈsək-shən \

Medical Definition of suction 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act or process of sucking

2a : the act or process of exerting a force upon a solid, liquid, or gaseous body by reason of reduced air pressure over part of its surface

b : force so exerted

3 : the act or process of removing secretions or fluids from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device (as a suction pump) that operates on negative pressure

suction

transitive verb

Medical Definition of suction (Entry 2 of 2)

: to remove from a body cavity or passage by suction

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More from Merriam-Webster on suction

See words that rhyme with suction

Spanish Central: Translation of suction

Nglish: Translation of suction for Spanish Speakers

Comments on suction

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