suck

verb
\ ˈsək \
sucked; sucking; sucks

Definition of suck 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to draw (something, such as liquid) into the mouth through a suction force produced by movements of the lips and tongue sucked milk from his mother's breast

b : to draw something from or consume by such movements suck an orange suck a lollipop

c : to apply the mouth to in order to or as if to suck out a liquid sucked his burned finger

2a : to draw by or as if by suction when a receding wave sucks the sand from under your feet —Kenneth Brower inadvertently sucked into the … intrigue —Martin Levin

b : to take in and consume by or as if by suction a vacuum cleaner sucking up dirt suck up a few beers opponents say that malls suck the life out of downtown areas —Michael Knight

intransitive verb

1 : to draw something in by or as if by exerting a suction force especially : to draw milk from a breast or udder with the mouth

2 : to make a sound or motion associated with or caused by suction his pipe sucked wetly flanks sucked in and out, the long nose resting on his paws —Virginia Woolf

3 : to act in an obsequious manner when they want votes … the candidates come sucking around —W. G. Hardy usually used with up sucked up to the boss

4 slang, sometimes vulgar : to be objectionable or inadequate our lifestyle sucksPlayboy people who went said it sucked —H. S. Thompson

suck it up

: to make the effort required to do or deal with something difficult or unpleasant

suck

noun

Definition of suck (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sucking movement or force

2 : the act of sucking

Examples of suck in a Sentence

Verb

sucking milk through a straw a toddler sucking his thumb She just sucked her teeth and stared. She sucked on an orange slice. I sucked a cough drop. The tide almost sucked us out to sea. The boat was sucked under the water in the storm. These plants suck moisture from the soil. The fan sucks smoke from the air. a vacuum cleaner that sucks up water as well as dirt

Noun

He took a suck on his pipe.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Such lassitude worries Western armies, which are reluctant to get sucked into another war. The Economist, "The fight against Islamic State is moving to Africa," 14 July 2018 Waitresses everywhere are routinely harassed by customers, and are often told to suck it up or risk losing tips, but for Hooters Girls, there is significant job overlap with the stripping industry. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "It’s Time for Hooters to GTFO," 23 June 2018 Almost instantly, a wave doubled up on the shallows, sucked me backwards over the falls, and sent me bouncing up the sand. Jeff Johnson, Outside Online, "Jeff Johnson on the First Time He Saved a Life," 11 July 2018 Maybe drinking an avocado frappuccino is the equivalent of telling those naysayers to go suck it (ideally out of a large Starbucks straw)? Cady Drell, Marie Claire, "Just Say No to the Starbucks Avocado Frappuccino," 5 July 2018 State officials monitor mosquito populations using cylindrical traps that lure the insects with a light and then suck them in with a fan. Scott Dance, Washington Post, "Mosquitoes are at three times their normal number in Maryland this summer," 5 July 2018 State officials monitor mosquito populations using cylindrical traps that lure the insects with a light and then suck them in with a fan. Scott Dance, baltimoresun.com, "Dealing with more bug bites than usual? Mosquitos are at 3 times their normal number in Maryland this summer.," 5 July 2018 Whole house fan sucked it in through the screens overnight. Jordan Cutler-tietjen, sacbee, "As County Fire rages, what's the risk from breathing? Here's air quality info for the region," 2 July 2018 Waitresses everywhere are routinely harassed by customers, and are often told to suck it up or risk losing tips, but for Hooters Girls, there is significant job overlap with the stripping industry. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "It’s Time for Hooters to GTFO," 23 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Maybe that explains one of the Washington women’s rowing team’s mottos this year: Embrace the suck. Matt Calkins, The Seattle Times, "Washington’s Triple Crown in rowing well earned," 29 May 2017 While these are technically DOT legal, FCA points out that the meats wear quickly on the highway, suck in the rain, and should not, under any circumstances, be used in any way, shape, or form at temperatures below 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Davey G. Johnson, Car and Driver, "Dodge Demands Owners Sign Waiver When Ordering Demon," 23 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'suck.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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History and Etymology for suck

Verb

Middle English suken, from Old English sūcan; akin to Old High German sūgan to suck, Latin sugere

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Dictionary Entries near suck

Suchocka

Süchow

suchwise

suck

suck-bottle

suck-egg

sucken

Statistics for suck

Last Updated

18 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

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More Definitions for suck

suck

verb

English Language Learners Definition of suck

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pull (liquid, air, etc.) into your mouth especially while your lips are forming a small hole

: to pull on (something in your mouth) with the muscles of your lips and mouth

: to let (something, such as candy or medicine) stay in your mouth as it melts

suck

noun

English Language Learners Definition of suck (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of sucking

suck

verb
\ ˈsək \
sucked; sucking

Kids Definition of suck

1 : to draw something (as liquid or air) into the mouth He sucked chocolate milk through a straw.

2 : to draw liquid from by action of the mouth He sucked an orange.

3 : to allow to dissolve gradually in the mouth suck a lollipop

4 : to put (as a thumb) into the mouth and draw on as if drawing liquid

5 : to take in by or as if by absorption or suction Plants suck moisture from the soil.

\ ˈsək \

Medical Definition of suck 

1 : to draw (as liquid) into the mouth through a suction force produced by movements of the lips and tongue sucked milk from her mother's breast

2 : to draw out by suction

intransitive verb

: to draw something in by or as if by exerting a suction force especially : to draw milk from a breast or udder with the mouth

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Comments on suck

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