stutter

1 of 2

verb

stut·​ter ˈstə-tər How to pronounce stutter (audio)
stuttered; stuttering; stutters

intransitive verb

1
: to speak with involuntary disruption or blocking of speech (as by repetition or prolongation of vocal sounds)
2
: to move or act in a halting or spasmodic manner
the old jalopy bucks and stutters uphillWilliam Cleary

transitive verb

: to say, speak, or sound with or as if with a stutter
stutterer noun

stutter

2 of 2

noun

1
: an act or instance of stuttering
2
: the habitual tendency to stutter
had a mild stutter
: stuttering

Examples of stutter in a Sentence

Verb I used to stutter when I was a child. She stutters when she gets excited.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Europe has stuttered since the disappearance of cheap Russian oil and gas in the wake of sanctions that followed the country’s invasion of Ukraine. Ryan Hogg, Fortune Europe, 6 Feb. 2024 Blunt was there to accept the Wells Fargo’s Power of Women Alumni Award for dedicating her time and energy to help children overcome stuttering through educational resources at the American Institute for Stuttering. Meredith Woerner, Variety, 17 Nov. 2023 Israeli artillery was on Ain Ebel’s doorstep, and Diab never stuttered. Matt Bradley, NBC News, 2 Nov. 2023 Others stutter out a few words and fall suddenly silent. Laura King, Los Angeles Times, 13 Oct. 2023 Since the financial crisis of the late 2000s, Portugal has embraced its role as a haven for foreign workers and investors in hopes of kick-starting the country’s stuttering economy. Ryan Hogg, Fortune, 3 Oct. 2023 In fact, roughly 3 million people in the United States stutter, and although research hasn’t supported a cure for this common condition, people overcome stuttering every day. Janine Henni, Peoplemag, 19 July 2023 When the world’s most recognizable cathedral, Notre Dame de Paris, burned on April 15, 2019, the toppling of its spire was the catastrophe’s defining moment — a dreamlike loop endlessly replayed, a stuttering stop-time interval that seemed, improbably, to last forever. Laura King, Los Angeles Times, 30 May 2023 One of his top spy chiefs, Sergei Naryshkin—himself a hawkish figure who bears more than a passing resemblance to Nosferatu—was reduced to stuttering at the lectern in the wake of Putin’s questioning. Ben Makuch, The New Republic, 26 July 2023
Noun
By the end of elementary school, to Dalton’s relief, the stutter had faded away. Andy Greenberg, WIRED, 14 Nov. 2023 There were no stutters in the UI but these slow-down of animations and tabs reloading at every unlock bothered me through my review process. Prakhar Khanna, Forbes, 28 Nov. 2023 The game is therefore targeted to hit 30 fps to provide a predictable update rate, fewer stutters, and a responsive interface. Kevin Purdy, Ars Technica, 19 Nov. 2023 Monroe’s signature breathy speaking voice was actually a tactic the actress used to overcome a childhood stutter. Vogue, 16 Nov. 2023 Wayne struggled with a stutter as a young lawyer but joined the educational group Toastmasters International to help improve his speech, Spievak said. Jeff McDonald, San Diego Union-Tribune, 17 Nov. 2023 In the midst of all this, when Dalton was 15, another kind of calamity struck: His stutter came back. Andy Greenberg, WIRED, 14 Nov. 2023 The dividend is the lowest paid to the Austrian shareholder in three years, and reflects a stutter in profitability last year in an otherwise exponential growth path for the company. Marton Eder, Fortune, 1 Nov. 2023 Read their personal stories Some of the most influential people in the world live with a stutter. Janine Henni, Peoplemag, 19 July 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'stutter.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

frequentative of English dialect stut to stutter, from Middle English stutten; akin to Dutch stotteren to stutter, Goth stautan to strike — more at contusion

First Known Use

Verb

1566, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1651, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of stutter was in 1566

Dictionary Entries Near stutter

Cite this Entry

“Stutter.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stutter. Accessed 22 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

stutter

1 of 2 verb
stut·​ter ˈstət-ər How to pronounce stutter (audio)
: to speak in an uneven way with involuntary repeating or interruption of sounds
stutterer noun

stutter

2 of 2 noun
1
: an act or instance of stuttering
2
: a speech disorder involving stuttering

Medical Definition

stutter

1 of 2 intransitive verb
stut·​ter ˈstət-ər How to pronounce stutter (audio)
: to speak with involuntary disruption or blocking of speech (as by repetition or prolongation of vocal sounds)

transitive verb

: to say, speak, or sound with or as if with a stutter

stutter

2 of 2 noun
1
: an act or instance of stuttering
2
: the habitual tendency to stutter
had a mild stutter
: stuttering sense 2
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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