strychnine

noun
strych·​nine | \ ˈstrik-ˌnīn How to pronounce strychnine (audio) , -nən, -ˌnēn \

Definition of strychnine

: a bitter poisonous alkaloid C21H22N2O2 that is obtained from nux vomica and related plants (genus Strychnos) and is used as a poison (as for rodents) and medicinally as a stimulant of the central nervous system

Examples of strychnine in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web And a case of strychnine poisoning that was somehow fudged into death by natural causes to prevent a scandal and keep Stanford running. Mark Peikert, Town & Country, 12 June 2022 White supports his theories with some crucial pieces of overlooked evidence, such as a brief mention in a newspaper story connecting Berner to a druggist who would have had access to strychnine. Maia Silber, The New Yorker, 30 May 2022 Newspapers widely reported those words, as well as the results of an autopsy that found traces of strychnine in her blood. Maia Silber, The New Yorker, 30 May 2022 The first round of strychnine, a massive dose of rat poison dissolved in a bottle of Poland Spring water, didn’t work. Los Angeles Times, 20 May 2022 Poison was the most effective lethal strategy; lacing a single deer carcass with strychnine could kill dozens of wolves. Paige Williams, The New Yorker, 28 Mar. 2022 This had been the choice of Sá-Carneiro, who put on his best suit and swallowed strychnine in a Paris hotel in 1916, depriving Pessoa of his best friend. Benjamin Kunkel, Harper's Magazine, 26 Oct. 2021 The yield was pitiful: just 0.0009% of the material turned into strychnine, while the remainder was wasted. Samanth Subramanian, Quartz, 6 Oct. 2021 In 2011, researchers used organocatalysis to synthesize strychnine in 12 steps. Brianna Abbott, WSJ, 6 Oct. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'strychnine.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of strychnine

1819, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for strychnine

French, from New Latin Strychnos, from Latin, nightshade, from Greek

Learn More About strychnine

Time Traveler for strychnine

Time Traveler

The first known use of strychnine was in 1819

See more words from the same year

Dictionary Entries Near strychnine

strychnic

strychnine

strychninism

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for strychnine

Last Updated

18 Jun 2022

Cite this Entry

“Strychnine.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/strychnine. Accessed 2 Jul. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for strychnine

strychnine

noun
strych·​nine | \ ˈstrik-ˌnīn How to pronounce strychnine (audio) , -nən How to pronounce strychnine (audio) , -ˌnēn How to pronounce strychnine (audio) \

Medical Definition of strychnine

: a bitter poisonous alkaloid C21H22N2O2 that is obtained from nux vomica and related plants of the genus Strychnos and is used as a poison (as for rodents) and medicinally as a stimulant of the central nervous system

More from Merriam-Webster on strychnine

Nglish: Translation of strychnine for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about strychnine

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Words Named After People

  • name tags
  • Namesake of the leotard, Jules Léotard had what profession?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!