stricture

noun
stric·​ture | \ ˈstrik-chər How to pronounce stricture (audio) \

Definition of stricture

1a : an abnormal narrowing of a bodily passage also : the narrowed part
b : a constriction of the breath passage in the production of a speech sound
2 : something that closely restrains or limits : restriction moral strictures
3 : an adverse criticism : censure

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Did You Know?

Stricture has meant many things through the centuries, and its "restriction" meaning—probably the most common one today—is actually the most recent. High-school teachers often put strictures on texting during class. Cities concerned about their murder rate have slapped strictures on the possession of handguns. And the United Nations may vote to put strictures on arms sales to a country that keeps violating international treaties. With the meaning "strong criticism", stricture is slightly old-fashioned today, but it's still used by intellectuals. So, for example, an article may amount to a harsh stricture on the whole medical profession, or an art review may just express the critic's strictures on sentimental paintings of cute little houses with glowing windows.

Examples of stricture in a Sentence

the church's strictures on the morals and mores of contemporary society the new zoning strictures effectively make further development along the riverfront commercially unviable

Recent Examples on the Web

The Senate bill does not contain most of the strictures that House Democrats are demanding to ensure humane treatment of migrant children in U.S. custody. Author: Mike Debonis, Erica Werner, Anchorage Daily News, "House Democrats pass border bill, setting up tense negotiation over migrants," 26 June 2019 The Senate bill, however, does not contain most of the strictures that House Democrats are demanding to ensure humane treatment of migrant children in U.S. custody. San Diego Union-Tribune, "House approves $4.5-billion bill to aid migrant care crisis at the border," 26 June 2019 The south has long been readier than the north to agitate against the strictures of caste. The Economist, "Why India’s south confounds the otherwise all-conquering Narendra Modi," 21 June 2019 The three-dimensional printing of organs is a challenge on Earth because printing the tiny structures inside organs requires scaffolding strictures to support the tissue shapes in Earth’s gravity. Chabeli Herrera, orlandosentinel.com, "SpaceX plans to launch 5,000 pounds of cargo to ISS tonight. But storms may push it to August," 24 July 2019 Iran has attempted to evade those strictures, while also repeatedly threatening to shut down the Strait of Hormuz if sanctions aren’t lifted. Ryan Dezember, WSJ, "Middle East Clashes Send Oil Sharply Higher," 20 June 2019 The three-dimensional printing of organs is a challenge on Earth because printing the tiny structures inside organs requires scaffolding strictures to support the tissue shapes in Earth’s gravity. Chabeli Herrera, orlandosentinel.com, "SpaceX is sending dozens of crucial science experiments to the ISS — and Nickelodeon slime," 18 July 2019 So many of its characters remain recognizable—blustering desperadoes, who believe in their right to act outside the law and then impose rules and strictures on others. Rachel Syme, The New Republic, "The Outlaw World of Deadwood," 6 June 2019 Removing conscious control can liberate the imagination; imposing strictures gives it something to bash against, building up muscle by enlarging the effort. Luc Sante, Harper's magazine, "A Crew of Variegated Weirdos," 10 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stricture.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stricture

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for stricture

Middle English, from Late Latin strictura, from Latin strictus, past participle

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Statistics for stricture

Last Updated

6 Sep 2019

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Time Traveler for stricture

The first known use of stricture was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for stricture

stricture

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stricture

formal
: a law or rule that limits or controls something
: a strong criticism

stricture

noun
stric·​ture | \ ˈstrik-chər How to pronounce stricture (audio) \

Medical Definition of stricture

: an abnormal narrowing of a bodily passage (as from inflammation, cancer, or the formation of scar tissue) esophageal stricture also : the narrowed part

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More from Merriam-Webster on stricture

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with stricture

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for stricture

Spanish Central: Translation of stricture

Nglish: Translation of stricture for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about stricture

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