stressor

noun
stress·​or | \ ˈstre-sər How to pronounce stressor (audio) , -ˌsȯr \

Definition of stressor

: a stimulus that causes stress

Examples of stressor in a Sentence

Credit card debt is a major stressor in her life.
Recent Examples on the Web And being aware of a significant stressor that's impossible to see can create fear, apprehension, anxiety and a potential sense of helplessness. Cathy Kozlowicz, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Suburban Milwaukee residents 'routinely' violate the safer-at-home order. Here's what police are doing about it.," 15 Apr. 2020 Lined with beautiful boxwoods and handsome hydrangeas, this garden has become a beloved space that regularly plays host to gatherings, but also serves as a quiet space to find respite from everyday stressors. al, "Get a glimpse into this beautiful Alabama garden," 6 Apr. 2020 Risk factors include social stressors, substance abuse, and mental illness like depression. Emmy Betz, STAT, "Covid-19 and suicide: an uncertain connection," 22 Apr. 2020 Financial difficulties The biggest stressor for many is financial. Jonathan Kanter, The Conversation, "COVID-19 could lead to an epidemic of clinical depression, and the health care system isn’t ready for that, either," 3 Apr. 2020 The greatest current stressors on Antarctic krill are warming seas and the retreat of ice around Antarctica rather than overfishing. Lucy Jakub, Harper's magazine, "A View to a Krill," 2 Mar. 2020 Researchers wanted to find out if minimum wage policies had an impact on suicides, which can be caused by financial stressors such as job loss, financial hardships or debt. Shelby Lin Erdman, CNN, "Increasing the minimum wage by $1 could reduce US suicide rates, study finds," 9 Jan. 2020 Those are the same stressors typically experienced by professional sports athletes competing at the highest levels. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Esports gamers experience same stressors as pro athletes, study finds," 19 Nov. 2019 And Congress quickly passed the CARES Act, a $2 trillion aid package to fight Covid-19 that included sending $1,200 checks to individuals and families who were most vulnerable to job loss and other financial stressors. Morgan Medlock, STAT, "Covid-19 will pass. Will we be able to say the same about the racism it has illuminated?," 23 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stressor.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stressor

1950, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for stressor

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The first known use of stressor was in 1950

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Statistics for stressor

Last Updated

4 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Stressor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stressor. Accessed 5 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for stressor

stressor

noun
How to pronounce stressor (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of stressor

: something that makes you worried or anxious : a source of stress

stressor

noun
stress·​or | \ ˈstres-ər How to pronounce stressor (audio) , -ˌȯ(ə)r How to pronounce stressor (audio) \

Medical Definition of stressor

: a stimulus that causes stress psychological stressors

More from Merriam-Webster on stressor

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with stressor

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