stool

noun
\ ˈstül How to pronounce stool (audio) \

Definition of stool

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a seat usually without back or arms supported by three or four legs or by a central pedestal
b : a low bench or portable support for the feet or knees : footstool
2 : a seat used as a symbol of office or authority also : the rank, dignity, office, or rule of a chieftain
3a : a discharge of fecal matter
b : a seat used while defecating or urinating
4a : a stump or group of stumps of a tree especially when producing suckers
b : a plant crown from which shoots grow out
c : a shoot or growth from a stool

stool

verb
stooled; stooling; stools

Definition of stool (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to throw out shoots in the manner of a stool

Examples of stool in a Sentence

Noun She sat on a stool. The patient had bloody stools.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Toilets and sewers effectively take stool samples from us everyday. Chelsea Wald, Wired, "The Pandemic Proved That Our Toilets Are Crap," 18 Apr. 2021 Many children test negative for SARS-CoV-2 on a nasal swab, but the virus may hide elsewhere in the body; stool samples may provide clues. Jennifer Couzin-frankel, Science | AAAS, "Studies chase clues to help kids with COVID-19–linked immune syndrome," 18 Mar. 2021 And with 1 trillion bacteria jam-packed into every gram of stool, that’s a telltale sign that gut microbes can influence anti-cancer immune responses. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Planning to get a COVID vaccine? This San Diego biotech wants your poop," 24 Mar. 2021 Cardinal Joseph Zen, the former bishop of Hong Kong and a longtime critic of Beijing, sat on a small stool. Timothy Mclaughlin, The Atlantic, "Hong Kong on Trial," 22 Mar. 2021 There are many legs of the stool, but the school garden movement is a critical leg. Alex Morris, Rolling Stone, "Kimbal Musk’s Quest to Start One Million Gardens," 20 Mar. 2021 Mark Buchanan, manager at the Side Door Saloon in Petoskey, Michigan, has been thinking of the stool where his friend Larry Cummings, a professor, used to sit on Monday nights for a chat, some football and a glass of ice water. Julie Bosman, BostonGlobe.com, "A ripple effect of loss: US COVID deaths approach 500,000," 21 Feb. 2021 Vedder begins the program perched calmly on a ubiquitous stool. Shana Naomi Krochmal, EW.com, "Pearl Jam's 1992 MTV Unplugged still rocks with righteous, relevant anger," 30 Oct. 2020 For maximum benefit, situate your purifier in the center of the room, at least three feet away from walls and corners and elevated on a stool or table. Laura Daily, Washington Post, "Can an air purifier help protect you against the coronavirus?," 19 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Jack Gilbert, director of the Microbiome Center at the University of Chicago, agrees that the observed change in pH is an interesting observation, and one that fits the current understanding that bifidobacterium lowers stool pH. Claire Maldarelli, Popular Science, "They don’t make baby poop like they did in 1926, that’s for sure. Here’s why scientists care.," 16 Mar. 2018 Weird but true: Dogs lower intestinal tract glands produce a clear, jelly-like slime to lubricate the colon and help stool pass more easily. Marygrace Taylor, Good Housekeeping, "6 Things Your Dog's Poop Can Tell You About Its Health," 11 July 2018 Weird but true: Dogs lower intestinal tract glands produce a clear, jelly-like slime to lubricate the colon and help stool pass more easily. Marygrace Taylor, Good Housekeeping, "6 Things Your Dog's Poop Can Tell You About Its Health," 11 July 2018 It's Coated In Mucus Weird but true: Dogs lower intestinal tract glands produce a clear, jelly-like slime to lubricate the colon and help stool pass more easily. Marygrace Taylor, Good Housekeeping, "6 Things Your Dog's Poop Can Tell You About Its Health," 13 Apr. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stool.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stool

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1770, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for stool

Noun

Middle English, from Old English stōl; akin to Old High German stuol chair, Old Church Slavonic stolŭ seat, throne

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Time Traveler for stool

Time Traveler

The first known use of stool was before the 12th century

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Statistics for stool

Last Updated

9 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Stool.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stool. Accessed 14 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for stool

stool

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stool

: a seat that fits one person and that has no back or arms
: a piece of furniture that supports the feet of a person who is sitting
medical : a piece of solid waste that is released from the body

stool

noun
\ ˈstül How to pronounce stool (audio) \

Kids Definition of stool

1 : a seat without back or arms supported by three or four legs or by a central post
2 : footstool
3 : a mass of bodily waste discharged from the intestine

stool

noun
\ ˈstül How to pronounce stool (audio) \

Medical Definition of stool

: a discharge of fecal matter

Comments on stool

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