stitch

noun
\ ˈstich How to pronounce stitch (audio) \

Definition of stitch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a local sharp and sudden pain especially in the side
2a : one in-and-out movement of a threaded needle in sewing, embroidering, or suturing
b : a portion of thread left in the material or suture left in the tissue after one stitch
3 : a least bit especially of clothing didn't have a stitch on
4 : a single loop of thread or yarn around an implement (such as a knitting needle or crochet hook)
5 : a stitch or series of stitches formed in a particular way a basting stitch
in stitches
: in a state of uncontrollable laughter he had us all in stitches

stitch

verb
stitched; stitching; stitches

Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to fasten, join, or close with or as if with stitches stitched a seam
b : to make, mend, or decorate with or as if with stitches
2 : to unite by means of staples

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Other Words from stitch

Verb

stitcher noun

Synonyms for stitch

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of stitch in a Sentence

Noun the stitches on a baseball She pulled out the stitches. His cut required six stitches. She gets her stitches removed tomorrow. The book teaches a variety of stitches. a scarf worked in knit stitch Verb He stitched a patch onto his coat. Her initials were stitched on the pillowcase. He stitched a design along the border of the tablecloth.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Bock had a head injury while whitewater rafting that required multiple stitches to repair. Tim Bielik, cleveland.com, "Kevin Love’s girlfriend, Kate Bock, got staples in her head after accident during their vacation," 30 Aug. 2019 Neal got up and pursued Phillips and struck him over the head, causing a large laceration over his eye that required several stitches, authorities said. Pete Grieve, SFChronicle.com, "Two men booked on suspicion of murder in San Francisco are released from jail," 29 Aug. 2019 The manufacturer, Harwood, developed the iconic figure-eight seam design involving 108 stitches and horsehide tanned on the outskirts of town. Lydia Depillis, ProPublica, "Everything You Need to Play Baseball Is Made in China — and Getting Hit by Trump’s Tariffs," 3 Sep. 2019 Show us belief’s wide skirt and the stitch that unravels fear’s caul. Thomas Curwenstaff Writer, Los Angeles Times, "Toni Morrison dead at 88: ‘Beloved’ author captured tragic and joyful complexion of life and race," 6 Aug. 2019 Show us belief’s wide skirt and the stitch that unravels fear’s caul. Martha Ross, The Mercury News, "In Toni Morrison’s own words: Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey, Kamala Harris among many paying tribute with favorite quotes," 6 Aug. 2019 Instead, the stitches in her incision were removed two days early. BostonGlobe.com, "a new survey of 2,700 US women published in June," 14 Sep. 2019 What remains of his cultlike following will face a choice: Admit the orange emperor never had a stitch of clothes and swallow the pain of their own gullibility, or stand by their man to keep the pain of reality at bay. Rex Huppke, chicagotribune.com, "Column: The Trumps will indeed be a dynasty that lasts for decades," 28 Aug. 2019 Granted, Victor’s clumsy stitch-work leaves much to be desired in the looks department — credit Angela Santori and Shannon Hutchins for suitably gruesome makeup that still allows Manuel to display the Creature’s wounded humanity. Philip Brandes, Los Angeles Times, "Review: In ‘Frankenstein’ at A Noise Within, a harrowing performance pulses with humanity," 23 Aug. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Thomas, 26, posted a photo of what appears to be a stitched-up incision on the back of one of his legs, where the melanoma was found. Maggie O'neill, Health.com, "Pro Golfer Justin Thomas Reveals Scar From Melanoma Tumor Removal on Instagram," 13 Sep. 2019 The moon landing helped, even if only temporarily, stitch it back together. oregonlive.com, "Moon landing inspired Americans 50 years ago, but they still worried about space battle with Soviets," 13 July 2019 By stitching together interviews with locals, quiet shots of the town and the stunning landscape that surrounds it, and footage of Bisbee’s preparations to reenact what happened, the film gently blows the dust of accumulated history off the past. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "The 21 best movies of 2018," 14 Dec. 2018 To create mirror-image RNAs, Church and his collaborators first need to make mirror enzymes capable of stitching together mirror building blocks. Quanta Magazine, "New Twist Found in the Story of Life’s Start," 26 Nov. 2014 Nonetheless, painful memories are stitched into the fabric of the city. Kurt Streeter, New York Times, "Richmond Is at a Crossroads. Will Arthur Ashe Boulevard Point the Way?," 21 June 2019 Text slates provide some context, but otherwise The Cold Blue story is stitched together with audio clips from nine B-17 crewmen Nelson interviewed around the country. Chuck Thompson, Popular Mechanics, "'Cold Blue' Shows the B-17 Bomber Like You've Never Seen It Before," 16 May 2019 Eight different words or phrases with importance to the bride were hand-stitched onto the dress, including her husband's full name, Nicholas Jerry Jonas; their wedding date; and her parents' names, Madhu and Ashok. Carrie Goldberg, Harper's BAZAAR, "Everything You Need to Know About Priyanka Chopra's Wedding Dresses," 4 Dec. 2018 As a first step toward making a copy of itself, a single strand of RNA can take up complementary nucleotide building blocks from its surroundings and stitch them together. Quanta Magazine, "Origin-of-Life Study Points to Chemical Chimeras, Not RNA," 16 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stitch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stitch

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for stitch

Noun

Middle English stiche, from Old English stice; akin to Old English stician to stick

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Statistics for stitch

Last Updated

5 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for stitch

The first known use of stitch was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for stitch

stitch

noun
How to pronounce stitch (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of stitch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a piece of thread that is passed through a piece of material with a needle
medical : a special piece of thread that is used to hold a large cut or wound closed
: a single loop of thread or yarn that is wrapped around a tool (such as a knitting needle) and is linked to other loops to make fabric

stitch

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

: to use a needle and thread to make or repair (something, such as a piece of clothing) : to join (something, such as a piece of fabric or a button) to something else with stitches
: to make (something, such as a design) out of stitches

stitch

noun
\ ˈstich How to pronounce stitch (audio) \

Kids Definition of stitch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : one in-and-out movement of a threaded needle in sewing or in closing a wound : a portion of thread left after one such movement
2 : a single loop of thread or yarn around a tool (as a knitting needle or crochet hook)
3 : a type or style of stitching
4 : a sudden sharp pain especially in the side

stitch

verb
stitched; stitching

Kids Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to fasten or join by sewing Stitch the ends of the two strips together.
2 : to make, mend, or decorate by or as if by sewing My mother stitched up my torn pants.

stitch

noun
\ ˈstich How to pronounce stitch (audio) \

Medical Definition of stitch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a local sharp and sudden pain especially in the side
2a : one in-and-out movement of a threaded needle in suturing
b : a portion of a suture left in the tissue after one stitch removal of stitches

Medical Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

: to fasten, join, or close with stitches stitch a wound

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More from Merriam-Webster on stitch

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for stitch

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with stitch

Spanish Central: Translation of stitch

Nglish: Translation of stitch for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stitch for Arabic Speakers

Comments on stitch

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