stitch

noun
\ ˈstich \

Definition of stitch 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a local sharp and sudden pain especially in the side

2a : one in-and-out movement of a threaded needle in sewing, embroidering, or suturing

b : a portion of thread left in the material or suture left in the tissue after one stitch

3 : a least bit especially of clothing didn't have a stitch on

4 : a single loop of thread or yarn around an implement (such as a knitting needle or crochet hook)

5 : a stitch or series of stitches formed in a particular way a basting stitch

in stitches

: in a state of uncontrollable laughter he had us all in stitches

stitch

verb
stitched; stitching; stitches

Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to fasten, join, or close with or as if with stitches stitched a seam

b : to make, mend, or decorate with or as if with stitches

2 : to unite by means of staples

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Other words from stitch

Verb

stitcher noun

Synonyms for stitch

Synonyms: Noun

ache, pain, pang, prick, shoot, smart, sting, throe, tingle, twinge

Synonyms: Verb

darn, sew, suture

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Examples of stitch in a Sentence

Noun

the stitches on a baseball She pulled out the stitches. His cut required six stitches. She gets her stitches removed tomorrow. The book teaches a variety of stitches. a scarf worked in knit stitch

Verb

He stitched a patch onto his coat. Her initials were stitched on the pillowcase. He stitched a design along the border of the tablecloth.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Harris was just two weeks out from major shoulder surgery when he was pulled over, searched, thrown to the ground and handcuffed over pleas about his fresh stitches, but never charged. Bruce Vielmetti, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "A driver was stopped and arrested, violently, over the color of his car. His lawsuit is finally headed to a resolution.," 14 June 2018 The balls were dropped from various heights to determine their bounciness; their cores were dissected; their stitches were pulled. Emma Baccellieri, SI.com, "The Home Runs Keep Increasing, But Are the Baseballs Different After All?," 29 May 2018 Even the smallest sound or miniscule movement can disrupt his stitch and set him off. John Petkovic, cleveland.com, "Academy Awards 2018: 'Phantom Thread' deserves to win Best Picture Oscar (commentary)," 2 Mar. 2018 The quilter's fabric is soft, her stitches shine with golden thread and the setting for seeing her handiwork is the stillness of a church. Bill Laitner, Detroit Free Press, "Auto worker's black-history quilt memorializes 5,000 souls lost to lynch mobs in U.S.," 12 Feb. 2018 Its eyelids are sealed, a stitch of linen on the lower lid. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "‘Choose Marriage or Education’," 29 May 2018 One stitch at a time, the Clines sisters plan to grow their social enterprise in order to continue to address the exploitation of women, create employment opportunities and to support individual empowerment. Kirby Adams, The Courier-Journal, "These one-of-a-kind textiles are empowering Louisville women," 13 July 2018 Presidio Officers’ Club, 50 Moraga Ave., S.F.. www.presidio.gov Crochet Jam with Ramekon O’Arwisters Learn one crochet stitch and then create an art piece using the crochet hook and fabric strips provided. SFChronicle.com, "Kids listings," 12 July 2018 Pearle is, after all, both her middle name and a homonym of purl, a type of knitting stitch. Liana Satenstein, Vogue, "Pearle Knits Is the Instagrammable Label Redefining the Tube Top," 9 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

For each composition, Hellwig spent up to five hours stitching and layering anywhere from three to 10 circuit boards together in Photoshop. Laura Mallonee, WIRED, "Colorful Circuit Cities Built From Motherboards, Processors, and Microchips," 11 July 2018 Rather, our conscious visual experience is stitched together out of these fragmentary static views. Daniel Glaser, A-LIST, "Out of Your Mind," 1 July 2018 Entekra, based in Ripon, California, uses a similar computerized factory to stitch together a house frame but doesn’t add the plumbing, wiring and insulation. Paul Davidson, USA TODAY, "With construction workers scarce, homebuilders turn to robots, software," 25 June 2018 Already scientists have been able to stitch together genetic pieces from various animals, as the fictional teams do in the Jurassic Park films. National Geographic, "Could Humans and Dinosaurs Coexist? Here's the Science.," 22 June 2018 The intimate tune is a product of good timing, reaching its full realization at the perfect moment, when White was able to seamlessly stitch together all of the moving pieces of the production with a passionate and direct delivery. Bryan Kress, Billboard, "Sarah White Enlists Dave Matthews for Intimate Duet 'Sweetheart': Exclusive," 20 June 2018 Each is made with Oaxacan blankets that are stitched together and stuffed with a recycled material composed from plastic bottles. Stephanie Granada, Sunset, "10 Stylish Pet Furniture Picks," 22 Jan. 2018 At first, though, I was left with an oblong mole — a noncancerous one, thank goodness — with an obvious demarcation where it had been stitched together (pictured below). Marci Robin, Allure, "Beauty Mark Makeover: Why I Chose to Reduce the Size of My Mole Instead of Getting It Removed," 13 July 2018 The process also involved mapping the mural by using what was left of it and going through old photos, along with consulting people familiar with the work, Coutts said, eventually stitching the artwork's original image back together. Cassie Dickman, sacbee, "Iconic Tower Records mural in downtown is getting a little love," 10 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stitch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stitch

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for stitch

Noun

Middle English stiche, from Old English stice; akin to Old English stician to stick

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Statistics for stitch

Last Updated

10 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stitch

The first known use of stitch was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for stitch

stitch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stitch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a piece of thread that is passed through a piece of material with a needle

medical : a special piece of thread that is used to hold a large cut or wound closed

: a single loop of thread or yarn that is wrapped around a tool (such as a knitting needle) and is linked to other loops to make fabric

stitch

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

: to use a needle and thread to make or repair (something, such as a piece of clothing) : to join (something, such as a piece of fabric or a button) to something else with stitches

: to make (something, such as a design) out of stitches

stitch

noun
\ ˈstich \

Kids Definition of stitch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : one in-and-out movement of a threaded needle in sewing or in closing a wound : a portion of thread left after one such movement

2 : a single loop of thread or yarn around a tool (as a knitting needle or crochet hook)

3 : a type or style of stitching

4 : a sudden sharp pain especially in the side

stitch

verb
stitched; stitching

Kids Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to fasten or join by sewing Stitch the ends of the two strips together.

2 : to make, mend, or decorate by or as if by sewing My mother stitched up my torn pants.

stitch

noun
\ ˈstich \

Medical Definition of stitch 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a local sharp and sudden pain especially in the side

2a : one in-and-out movement of a threaded needle in suturing

b : a portion of a suture left in the tissue after one stitch removal of stitches

Medical Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

: to fasten, join, or close with stitches stitch a wound

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