stitch

noun
\ˈstich \

Definition of stitch 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a local sharp and sudden pain especially in the side

2a : one in-and-out movement of a threaded needle in sewing, embroidering, or suturing

b : a portion of thread left in the material or suture left in the tissue after one stitch

3 : a least bit especially of clothing didn't have a stitch on

4 : a single loop of thread or yarn around an implement (such as a knitting needle or crochet hook)

5 : a stitch or series of stitches formed in a particular way a basting stitch

in stitches

: in a state of uncontrollable laughter he had us all in stitches

stitch

verb
stitched; stitching; stitches

Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to fasten, join, or close with or as if with stitches stitched a seam

b : to make, mend, or decorate with or as if with stitches

2 : to unite by means of staples

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Other Words from stitch

Verb

stitcher noun

Synonyms for stitch

Synonyms: Noun

ache, pain, pang, prick, shoot, smart, sting, throe, tingle, twinge

Synonyms: Verb

darn, sew, suture

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Examples of stitch in a Sentence

Noun

the stitches on a baseball She pulled out the stitches. His cut required six stitches. She gets her stitches removed tomorrow. The book teaches a variety of stitches. a scarf worked in knit stitch

Verb

He stitched a patch onto his coat. Her initials were stitched on the pillowcase. He stitched a design along the border of the tablecloth.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

While presenting the award for Best Documentary Short and Best Live Action Short alongside SNL alum Maya Rudolph, the Girls Trip star strolled out in Ugg slippers, heels in hand, and had the room in stitches. refinery29.com, "She Did It: Tiffany Haddish Rewore That SNL Look — Again," 19 June 2018 With a couple of stitches and a little time, episiotomies generally heal well, and having had an episiotomy doesn’t typically affect mobility. Kate Morgan, The Cut, "Everything to Know About Having a C-Section Versus Vaginal Birth," 15 May 2018 The day after the attack, police contacted a relative of Oscar’s owner, who said the dog needed stitches. Deborah Kadin, chicagotribune.com, "Police reports: Dachshund injured after it is attacked by pit bull in Elmwood Park," 8 June 2018 Portland general manager Gavin Wilkinson, who joined the Timbers as a player in 2001 and later served as the club's head coach, had to get stitches after each of his first two games against Seattle after being elbowed in the chin and forehead. Jamie Goldberg, OregonLive.com, "Portland Timbers-Seattle Sounders rivalry reaches milestone as clubs prepare for 100th game," 10 May 2018 Josh Richardson played through a sore shoulder to wreak havoc on the defensive end, and Justise Winslow kept charging down the court after getting four stitches near his eye. Bruce Jenkins, San Francisco Chronicle, "Knicks should tread carefully with Mark Jackson," 21 Apr. 2018 As the cake was being served, a neighbor, Mr. Aryan, burst in, drunk, threw the cake against the wall, insulted Todd’s mother, and knocked a few toddlers out of their seats, requiring them to get stitches. George Saunders, The New Yorker, "Little St. Don," 19 Feb. 2016 A couple days after the regional tournament, Douglas was fishing at Crystal Beach and cut his right hand open, which required six stitches. Elliot Lapin, Houston Chronicle, "Douglas puts Hargrave golf ‘on the map’ with top 10 finish at state," 22 May 2018 The daemon was not on hand to mask the Italian's physical ailments - the 220 internal stitches that bound together his right knee. SI.com, "World Cup Countdown: 6 Weeks to Go - Roberto Baggio & the Elusive Daemon of Genius," 13 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

As hardware continues to get smaller and battery life advances, some are even looking toward a future where monitors are stitched into clothing or clipped onto a jacket for a minute-by-minute reading. Jason Plautz, WIRED, "Cheap, Portable Sensors Are Democratizing Air-Quality Data," 11 July 2018 The 10-spoke light alloy wheels and two-tone teardrop tank even out the bike’s heft, as does the wider-than-other-Scramblers stitched seat. Fortune, "Is the Bigger, Beefier Ducati Scrambler 1100 the One for You?," 27 June 2018 What’s notable is how the Mariners arrived here: through those many trades (as well as several waiver claims and a few free-agent signings), stitched together to build the first true contender of Dipoto’s tenure. Jon Tayler, SI.com, "How Mariners GM Jerry Dipoto Wheeled and Dealed His Way to First-Half Success," 22 June 2018 The project would stitch together Johns Hopkins Hospital’s redevelopment efforts with some of the city’s wealthier neighborhoods, including Fells Point, Harbor Point and Harbor East. Yvonne Wenger, baltimoresun.com, "Pugh administration seeks $102 million subsidy for East Baltimore, Perkins Homes redevelopment," 19 June 2018 But what happened next was anything but routine — as a nurse attempted to stitch up her cut, medical glue trickled into her open eye. Sarah Schreiber, Good Housekeeping, "Mom Cuts Off Her Eyelashes After a Medical Glue Accident Left Her Eye Closed Shut," 21 Dec. 2016 On impulse ahead of an accessories show, Brosnahan stayed up all night to tear her small logo from the inside of her bags and stitch them to the outside. Kate Gibson, CBS News, "Kate Spade began with a simple wish: An unfussy handbag," 5 June 2018 Momotaro’s craftsmen hand-stitch them inside the fabric so they can’t be seen, a method that, by their reckoning, makes the pocket more durable. Suryatapa Bhattacharya, WSJ, "The Hottest Jeans Cost $2,000 and Are Made in Japan," 5 June 2018 Common values that stitched us together as Americans. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "Barack Obama Hopes to Empower Young People in His First Speech Post-Presidency," 24 Apr. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stitch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stitch

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for stitch

Noun

Middle English stiche, from Old English stice; akin to Old English stician to stick

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Statistics for stitch

Last Updated

5 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stitch

The first known use of stitch was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for stitch

stitch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stitch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a piece of thread that is passed through a piece of material with a needle

medical : a special piece of thread that is used to hold a large cut or wound closed

: a single loop of thread or yarn that is wrapped around a tool (such as a knitting needle) and is linked to other loops to make fabric

stitch

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

: to use a needle and thread to make or repair (something, such as a piece of clothing) : to join (something, such as a piece of fabric or a button) to something else with stitches

: to make (something, such as a design) out of stitches

stitch

noun
\ˈstich \

Kids Definition of stitch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : one in-and-out movement of a threaded needle in sewing or in closing a wound : a portion of thread left after one such movement

2 : a single loop of thread or yarn around a tool (as a knitting needle or crochet hook)

3 : a type or style of stitching

4 : a sudden sharp pain especially in the side

stitch

verb
stitched; stitching

Kids Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to fasten or join by sewing Stitch the ends of the two strips together.

2 : to make, mend, or decorate by or as if by sewing My mother stitched up my torn pants.

stitch

noun
\ˈstich \

Medical Definition of stitch 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a local sharp and sudden pain especially in the side

2a : one in-and-out movement of a threaded needle in suturing

b : a portion of a suture left in the tissue after one stitch removal of stitches

Medical Definition of stitch (Entry 2 of 2)

: to fasten, join, or close with stitches stitch a wound

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Comments on stitch

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