1

stipulate

play
verb stip·u·late \ˈsti-pyə-ˌlāt\

Definition of stipulate

stipulated

;

stipulating

  1. intransitive verb
  2. 1 :  to make an agreement or covenant to do or forbear something :  contract

  3. 2 :  to demand an express term in an agreement —used with for

  4. transitive verb
  5. 1 :  to specify as a condition or requirement (as of an agreement or offer)

  6. 2 :  to give a guarantee of

stipulator

play \-ˌlā-tər\ noun

stipulate was our Word of the Day on 09/01/2007. Hear the podcast!

Examples of stipulate in a Sentence

  1. The cease-fire was stipulated by the treaty.

  2. The rules stipulate that players must wear uniforms.

Did You Know?

Like many terms used in the legal profession, "stipulate" has its roots in Latin. It derives from "stipulatus," the past participle of "stipulari," a verb meaning "to demand a guarantee (as from a prospective debtor)." "Stipulate" has been a part of the English language since the 17th century. In Roman law, oral contracts were deemed valid only if they followed a proper question-and-answer format; "stipulate" was sometimes used specifically of this process of contract making, though it also could be used more generally for any means of making a contract or agreement. The "specify as a condition or requirement" sense of the word also dates from the 17th century, and it is the sense that is most often encountered in current use.

Origin and Etymology of stipulate

Latin stipulatus, past participle of stipulari to demand a guarantee (from a prospective debtor)


First Known Use: circa 1624


2

stipulate

play
adjective stip·u·late \ˈsti-pyə-lət\

Definition of stipulate

  1. :  having stipules

Origin and Etymology of stipulate

New Latin stipula


First Known Use: circa 1776


STIPULATE Defined for English Language Learners

stipulate

play
verb

Definition of stipulate for English Language Learners

  • : to demand or require (something) as part of an agreement


Law Dictionary

stipulate

play
verb stip·u·late \ˈsti-pyə-ˌlāt\

Legal Definition of stipulate

stipulated

stipulating

  1. intransitive verb
  2. 1 :  to make an agreement or covenant about something (as damages)

  3. 2 :  to demand a particular promise in an agreement —used with for may…assume or stipulate for obligations of all kinds — Louisiana Civil Code

  4. 3 :  to agree respecting an aspect of legal proceedings —used with to stipulated to a dismissal of the claim with prejudice — National Law Journal pleaded guilty to the charge of battery and stipulated to the underlying facts — Luna v. Meinke, 844 F. Supp. 1284 (1994)

  5. transitive verb
  6. 1 :  to specify especially as a condition or requirement of an agreement parties may not stipulate the invalidity of statutes or ordinances — West v. Bank of Commerce & Trusts, 167 F.2d 664 (1948) the contract stipulated that the lessor was responsible for maintenance within a stipulated period of time

  7. 2 :  to establish (procedure or evidence) by agreement during a proceeding defendant stipulated that evidence was sufficient to support his conspiracy conviction — National Law Journal based on stipulated facts

Origin and Etymology of stipulate

Latin stipulatus, past participle of stipulari to exact (as from a prospective debtor) a formal guarantee when making an oral contract



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