steadfast

adjective
stead·​fast | \ ˈsted-ˌfast How to pronounce steadfast (audio) also -fəst \

Definition of steadfast

1a : firmly fixed in place : immovable
b : not subject to change the steadfast doctrine of original sin— Ellen Glasgow
2 : firm in belief, determination, or adherence : loyal her followers have remained steadfast

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Other Words from steadfast

steadfastly adverb
steadfastness \ ˈsted-​ˌfas(t)-​nəs How to pronounce steadfastness (audio) , -​fəs(t)-​ \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for steadfast

faithful, loyal, constant, staunch, steadfast, resolute mean firm in adherence to whatever one owes allegiance. faithful implies unswerving adherence to a person or thing or to the oath or promise by which a tie was contracted. faithful to her promise loyal implies a firm resistance to any temptation to desert or betray. remained loyal to the czar constant stresses continuing firmness of emotional attachment without necessarily implying strict obedience to promises or vows. constant friends staunch suggests fortitude and resolution in adherence and imperviousness to influences that would weaken it. a staunch defender of free speech steadfast implies a steady and unwavering course in love, allegiance, or conviction. steadfast in their support resolute implies firm determination to adhere to a cause or purpose. a resolute ally

Did You Know?

Steadfast has held its ground in English for many centuries. Its Old English predecessor, stedefæst, combined stede (meaning "place" or "stead") and fæst (meaning "firmly fixed"). An Old English text of the late 10th century, called The Battle of Maldon, contains our earliest record of the word, which was first used in battle contexts to describe warriors who stood their ground. Soon, it was also being used with the broad meaning "immovable," and as early as the 13th century it was applied to those unswerving in loyalty, faith, or friendship. Centuries later, all of these meanings endure.

Examples of steadfast in a Sentence

He was steadfast in his support of the governor's policies. a steadfast supporter of women's rights
Recent Examples on the Web That stubbornness was steadfast in the face of lobbying from tribal groups and activists. Ann Killion, SFChronicle.com, "Washington’s NFL team finds morality when its bottom line is threatened," 13 July 2020 The prime minister showed steadfast loyalty during waves of unrest and could emerge as a presidential rival in 2022. NBC News, "French government resigns as Macron acts to recast presidency," 3 July 2020 However, our victims remained steadfast and brave throughout this entire process. Madeline Holcombe, CNN, "The Golden State Killer's guilty plea closes a chapter for victims left waiting for decades," 30 June 2020 Even politicians who have built reputations on steadfast opposition to corruption and the influence of the wealthy have seemingly dispensed with those convictions in order to ensure a Biden victory this fall. J.c. Pan, The New Republic, "Democrats Can’t Quit Their Addiction to Big-Money Donors," 30 June 2020 Her governance revolves around social inclusion, innovation, sustainable development, and environmental issues, earning her a pioneering reputation among city leaders around the world for her steadfast commitment to climate action. Lindsey Tramuta, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Mayor Anne Hidalgo Plans to Reinvent Paris," 29 June 2020 But questions are bubbling whether that disenchantment undermines support for the president among his most steadfast backers. Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times, "Could Supreme Court rebukes of Trump policy cost him critical support from white evangelical voters?," 26 June 2020 Until recently, Republican and Democratic administrations were similarly steadfast in guaranteeing Kosovo’s security, and worked closely with European allies to do so. Patrick Kingsleyand Kenneth P. Vogel, BostonGlobe.com, "Pushing for Serbia-Kosovo peace deal, US roils allies," 20 June 2020 The Zarembas and Sawickis became steadfast friends and travel companions — the husbands were both proud Poles and loved exploring their ancestral homeland, which led to their volunteerism within the Mobile International Festival. Michael Dumas, al, "‘Kaz’ Zaremba lived a life in service of knowledge and compassion," 12 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'steadfast.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of steadfast

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for steadfast

Middle English stedefast, from Old English stedefæst, from stede + fæst fixed, fast

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Time Traveler for steadfast

Time Traveler

The first known use of steadfast was before the 12th century

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Last Updated

20 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Steadfast.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/steadfast. Accessed 12 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for steadfast

steadfast

adjective
How to pronounce steadfast (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of steadfast

: very devoted or loyal to a person, belief, or cause : not changing

steadfast

adjective
stead·​fast | \ ˈsted-ˌfast How to pronounce steadfast (audio) \

Kids Definition of steadfast

1 : not changing : resolute a steadfast refusal
2 : loyal steadfast friends

Other Words from steadfast

steadfastly adverb
steadfastness noun

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Comments on steadfast

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