stagnate

verb
stag·nate | \ˈstag-ˌnāt \
stagnated; stagnating

Definition of stagnate 

intransitive verb

: to become or remain stagnant

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Other Words from stagnate

stagnation \stag-ˈnā-shən \ noun

Examples of stagnate in a Sentence

a puddle of stagnating water

Recent Examples on the Web

But proponents say any pay transparency is useful, both for shareholders and for employees who have seen their own wages stagnate as CEO pay climbs. Alexia Elejalde-ruiz, chicagotribune.com, "Renegotiating your pay? A new CEO-to-worker pay ratio could help," 27 Apr. 2018 No-poaching agreements, like noncompete clauses, enhance employers’ labor market power by depriving workers of the threat to quit if wages fall or stagnate. Suresh Naidu, Eric Posner, Vox, "More and more companies have monopoly power over workers’ wages. That’s killing the economy.," 6 Apr. 2018 The world of this Purge movie feels very much like our own, with protesters asking why the government is targeting the poor for this experiment, while other citizens support it as necessary to help a stagnating nation. Aaron Couch, The Hollywood Reporter, "'First Purge' Director on Its Big Donald Trump Moment," 4 July 2018 City planners predict Anchorage will be short on housing for several thousand people by 2040, even amid the state recession and a stagnating local population. Devin Kelly, Anchorage Daily News, "Condos on top of shops: A proposed Dimond Boulevard project signals a new kind of Anchorage growth," 24 June 2018 Growing up in a stagnating factory town, where violence and xenophobia are endemic, Eddy was subjected to torment that was only compounded by his sexuality; ultimately, his attraction to men may have been his salvation. Joumana Khatib, New York Times, "New in Paperback: ‘Why Buddhism Is True,’ ‘The End of Eddy’," 15 June 2018 As wages stagnated, corporate profits—and stockmarkets—touched record highs. The Economist, "Worker shortages could heal America’s economy," 12 July 2018 The cold front will stagnate air patterns, allowing storms to build and move slowly, Burns said. Zachary Hansen, ajc, "THURSDAY’S WEATHER-TRAFFIC: Storm chances ramp up as cold front approaches," 12 July 2018 Yet, about five or six years into the business, Sejour noticed that the restaurants were stagnating. Nancy Dahlberg, miamiherald, "The odds are stacked against success stories like these," 10 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stagnate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stagnate

1661, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for stagnate

Latin stagnatus, past participle of stagnare, from stagnum body of standing water

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Statistics for stagnate

Last Updated

11 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stagnate

The first known use of stagnate was in 1661

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More Definitions for stagnate

stagnate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stagnate

: to stop developing, progressing, moving, etc. : to be or become stagnant

stagnate

verb
stag·nate | \ˈstag-ˌnāt \
stagnated; stagnating

Kids Definition of stagnate

: to be or become inactive or still Business has stagnated.

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Comments on stagnate

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