stagnate

verb
stag·​nate | \ ˈstag-ˌnāt How to pronounce stagnate (audio) \
stagnated; stagnating

Definition of stagnate

intransitive verb

: to become or remain stagnant

Examples of stagnate in a Sentence

a puddle of stagnating water
Recent Examples on the Web Unfortunately the economy continues to stagnate and millions of people are still out of work. Jennifer Yellin, CNN Underscored, "Start getting rid of your debt in 2021 with these balance transfer credit cards," 23 Dec. 2020 After falling to record lows in some polls earlier this year, Putin’s popularity ratings have picked up in recent months, even as incomes stagnate and the economy struggles to recover from the impact of the coronavirus. Henry Meyer, Bloomberg.com, "For Some in Russia’s Elite, Putin’s Future Is Again a Hot Topic," 20 Dec. 2020 But at the current juncture, the recovery is starting to stagnate and needs an extra push to continue or risk a further decline, some economists argue. Anne Sraders, Fortune, "More Republicans believe the economy is improving while Democrats think it’s getting worse," 15 Dec. 2020 The unemployment is continuing to stagnate or go up. al, "Doug Jones says Biden hasn’t talked to him about AG job," 9 Nov. 2020 The German economy could stagnate or even shrink in the final three months of the year, the Bundesbank said on Monday. Raymond Colitt, Bloomberg.com, "Merkel Wants to Limit Party Guests to Two to Stem Virus Spread," 16 Nov. 2020 The Dolphins sustained a first career start by Tua Tagovailoa that saw the offense stagnate, albeit against Aaron Donald and a top-notch Rams defense. Kenny Rosarion, sun-sentinel.com, "Instant Analysis: Miami Dolphins 28, Los Angeles Rams 17," 1 Nov. 2020 Venezuela’s oil output began to stagnate, a situation that worsened further after the coup attempt of April 2002. Steve H. Hanke, National Review, "Last Rites for Venezuela’s State-Owned Oil Company," 23 Oct. 2020 Burkina Faso has become just another of many countries — from Afghanistan to Iraq, Libya to Somalia — where the United States has spent time and energy and money, only to see the mission stagnate, worsen or outright fail. Nick Turse, New York Times, "How One of the Most Stable Nations in West Africa Descended Into Mayhem," 15 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stagnate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stagnate

1661, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for stagnate

Latin stagnatus, past participle of stagnare, from stagnum body of standing water

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Time Traveler for stagnate

Time Traveler

The first known use of stagnate was in 1661

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Statistics for stagnate

Last Updated

16 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Stagnate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stagnate. Accessed 26 Feb. 2021.

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More Definitions for stagnate

stagnate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stagnate

: to stop developing, progressing, moving, etc. : to be or become stagnant

stagnate

verb
stag·​nate | \ ˈstag-ˌnāt How to pronounce stagnate (audio) \
stagnated; stagnating

Kids Definition of stagnate

: to be or become inactive or still Business has stagnated.

More from Merriam-Webster on stagnate

Nglish: Translation of stagnate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stagnate for Arabic Speakers

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