spoiler

noun
spoil·er | \ˈspȯi-lər \

Definition of spoiler 

1a : one that spoils

b : one (such as a political candidate) having little or no chance of winning but capable of depriving a rival of success

2a : a long narrow plate along the upper surface of an airplane wing that may be raised for reducing lift and increasing drag — see airplane illustration

b : an air deflector on an automobile to reduce the tendency to lift off the road at high speeds

3 : information about the plot of a motion picture or TV program that can spoil a viewer's sense of surprise or suspense also : a person who discloses such information

Examples of spoiler in a Sentence

The review contains a few spoilers, so don't read it if you haven't seen the movie.

Recent Examples on the Web

Not wanting to divulge too many spoilers, Webster says her shows are meant to evoke the origin story of Nepenthe and the region’s connection to old Hollywood. Wallace Baine, San Francisco Chronicle, "Why did Old Hollywood celebs love Big Sur so much?," 31 May 2018 Gillian Flynn famously captured the effort to be chill in Gone Girl, and while (spoiler) faking your own kidnapping is a bit much, that effort is all too relatable. Sophia Benoit, Allure, "Hey Men, It's Not My Job to Like Your Hobbies If You Don't Give a Damn About Mine," 23 Apr. 2018 Though the film has already opened, Beck is careful not to share any spoilers. Aaron Couch, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Ant-Man and the Wasp' Composer on Working to "Make People Cry"," 13 July 2018 Production on the serious has been notoriously secretive, with HBO even going so far as to film multiple endings to spoiler-proof the show. Kevin Kelleher, Fortune, "'Game of Thrones' Season 8 Has Ended Filming. Now a Winter of Waiting Begins," 9 July 2018 Photo: Zuma Press Washington has described Mr. Abbas as a potential spoiler. Felicia Schwartz And Dov Lieber, WSJ, "Palestinians Lose Patience With Abbas as Frustrations Pile Up," 6 July 2018 Aware of the worry, Ms. Andras made a bold and unusual move, in this era of spoiler-phobic showrunners. Maureen Ryan, New York Times, "A Cult Show’s Recipe for Success: Whiskey, Twitter and Complex Women," 6 July 2018 Real-life events shouldn’t require spoiler warnings, but those who wish to preserve the freshness of a first viewing should tread carefully over the next few paragraphs. Justin Chang, latimes.com, "'Three Identical Strangers' is a riveting account of identical triplets separated at birth," 28 June 2018 But that wing is hollow, with airflow through each of its stanchions controlled by an electric motor—and there’s a similar system in the front spoiler to balance front–rear lift. Ezra Dyer, Popular Mechanics, "The Future of Automotive Aerodynamics," 19 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'spoiler.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of spoiler

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about spoiler

Statistics for spoiler

Last Updated

10 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for spoiler

The first known use of spoiler was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for spoiler

spoiler

noun
spoil·er | \ˈspȯi-lər\

Kids Definition of spoiler

1 : a person or thing that spoils something A spoiler beat the predicted winner.

2 : a device (as on an airplane or automobile) that controls the flow of air and lift

3 : information about the plot of a book, movie, or television show that spoils the surprise or suspense for a reader or viewer

More from Merriam-Webster on spoiler

See words that rhyme with spoiler

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about spoiler

Comments on spoiler

What made you want to look up spoiler? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

lying above or upon

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Words from Greek and Roman Mythology Quiz

  • the-triumph-of-venus-by-alessandro-magnasco
  • Boreal comes from the name of the ancient Greek god of which wind?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Citation

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!