simulate

verb
sim·​u·​late | \ ˈsim-yə-ˌlāt How to pronounce simulate (audio) \
simulated; simulating

Definition of simulate

transitive verb

1 : to give or assume the appearance or effect of often with the intent to deceive : imitate
2 : to make a simulation of (something, such as a physical system)

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Other Words from simulate

simulative \ ˈsim-​yə-​ˌlā-​tiv How to pronounce simulative (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for simulate

assume, affect, pretend, simulate, feign, counterfeit, sham mean to put on a false or deceptive appearance. assume often implies a justifiable motive rather than an intent to deceive. assumed an air of cheerfulness around the patients affect implies making a false show of possessing, using, or feeling. affected an interest in art pretend implies an overt and sustained false appearance. pretended that nothing had happened simulate suggests a close imitation of the appearance of something. cosmetics that simulate a suntan feign implies more artful invention than pretend, less specific mimicry than simulate. feigned sickness counterfeit implies achieving the highest degree of verisimilitude of any of these words. an actor counterfeiting drunkenness sham implies an obvious falseness that fools only the gullible. shammed a most unconvincing limp

Did You Know?

The zircon, that favorite of home shopping channels, simulates a diamond—more or less. A skilled furrier can dye lower-grade furs to simulate real mink. A skilled actress can simulate a range of emotions from absolute joy to crushing despair. And an apparatus that simulates the hazards of driving while intoxicated is likely to provide some very real benefits.

Examples of simulate in a Sentence

The model will be used to simulate the effects of an earthquake. cosmetics that simulate a suntan
Recent Examples on the Web In a real jolt of realism, Kapler had Joey Bart start the top of the seventh and final inning on second base to simulate how extra innings will begin under a temporary rule (one hopes) to get teams off the field faster amid the pandemic. Henry Schulman, SFChronicle.com, "Giants try to get serious in a ballgame that features homers by Sandoval, Pence," 11 July 2020 But Rossi said there’s only so much drivers can do to simulate conditions that, at times, were near unbearable over the weekend. Nathan Brown, The Indianapolis Star, "IndyCar introduces new cooling, hydration measures to address cockpit heat: 'It’s brutal'," 10 July 2020 This project allows researchers to simulate the formation and evolution of galaxies over time. Ashley Strickland, CNN, "New stars found in the Milky Way were born outside of it," 12 July 2020 Motors simulate brake- and accelerator-pedal and steering resistance and feedback. Clifford Atiyeh, Car and Driver, "Imitation Games: We Take an $80 Million Driving Simulator For A Spin," 11 July 2020 However, the company’s tests of how pilots would react didn’t simulate the complex and potentially confusing emergency scenario that pilots encountered, the report said. Alan Levin, Bloomberg.com, "Boeing Withheld Data on System Linked to Crashes, Report Says," 1 July 2020 Today, computers can simulate the 3D Ising model and approximate its critical exponents to a reasonable degree of accuracy, so there’s little urgency to find an exact solution. Quanta Magazine, "The Cartoon Picture of Magnets That Has Transformed Science," 24 June 2020 Because of this lack of data, computer models that simulate present and future climates overpredict how much sunlight reaches the ocean surface compared to what satellites actually observe. Thomas Hill, The Conversation, "We caught bacteria from the most pristine air on earth to help solve a climate modeling mystery," 19 June 2020 One way to do it is to input recent temperature data into a climate model and then simulate ahead a year or two. Scott K. Johnson, Ars Technica, "Using past data to predict whether 2020 will be the warmest on record," 19 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'simulate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of simulate

1652, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for simulate

Latin simulatus, past participle of simulare to copy, represent, feign, from similis like — more at same

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Time Traveler for simulate

Time Traveler

The first known use of simulate was in 1652

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Statistics for simulate

Last Updated

3 Aug 2020

Cite this Entry

“Simulate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/simulate. Accessed 14 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for simulate

simulate

verb
How to pronounce simulate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of simulate

: to look, feel, or behave like (something)
sim·​u·​late | \ ˈsim-yə-ˌlāt How to pronounce simulate (audio) \
simulated; simulating

Medical Definition of simulate

: to have or produce a symptomatic resemblance to lesions simulating leprosy

Other Words from simulate

simulation \ ˌsim-​yə-​ˈlā-​shən How to pronounce simulation (audio) \ noun
sim·​u·​late | \ ˈsim-yə-ˌlāt How to pronounce simulate (audio) \
simulated; simulating

Legal Definition of simulate

in the civil law of Louisiana : to make or carry out in a manner that does not express one's true intent a simulated sale of the debtor's property in which no consideration was paid

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Comments on simulate

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