sedative

adjective
sed·​a·​tive | \ ˈse-də-tiv How to pronounce sedative (audio) \

Definition of sedative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: tending to calm, moderate, or tranquilize nervousness or excitement

sedative

noun

Definition of sedative (Entry 2 of 2)

: a sedative agent or drug

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Examples of sedative in a Sentence

Adjective some people find a glass of wine to be a civilized and sedative addition to an evening meal Noun The patient was given a powerful sedative.
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The sedative side effect can be both a blessing and a curse, as Dr. Hoffman once discovered when his own toddler slept through a flight to Hawaii only to stay awake all night. Marnie Hanel, New York Times, "How to Manage a Carsick Kid," 17 Apr. 2020 Making matters worse, doctors commonly prescribe sedative drugs to suppress violent coughing and help patients tolerate the distress and discomfort of a breathing tube. Kelly Servick, Science | AAAS, "For survivors of severe COVID-19, beating the virus is just the beginning," 8 Apr. 2020 The brain adapted to the sedative effect of the drugs to the point where patients would pop a calming pill just to treat the symptoms of withdrawal since the previous dose. Knvul Sheikh, New York Times, "Dr. Heather Ashton, 90, Dies; Helped People Quit Anxiety Drugs," 3 Jan. 2020 The brain adapted to the sedative effect of the drugs to the point where patients would pop a calming pill just to treat the symptoms of withdrawal since the previous dose. Knvul Sheikh, New York Times, "Dr. Heather Ashton, 90, Dies; Helped People Quit Anxiety Drugs," 3 Jan. 2020 The brain adapted to the sedative effect of the drugs to the point where patients would pop a calming pill just to treat the symptoms of withdrawal since the previous dose. Knvul Sheikh, New York Times, "Dr. Heather Ashton, 90, Dies; Helped People Quit Anxiety Drugs," 3 Jan. 2020 The brain adapted to the sedative effect of the drugs to the point where patients would pop a calming pill just to treat the symptoms of withdrawal since the previous dose. Knvul Sheikh, New York Times, "Dr. Heather Ashton, 90, Dies; Helped People Quit Anxiety Drugs," 3 Jan. 2020 The brain adapted to the sedative effect of the drugs to the point where patients would pop a calming pill just to treat the symptoms of withdrawal since the previous dose. Knvul Sheikh, BostonGlobe.com, "Dr. Heather Ashton, 90; helped people quit anxiety drugs," 5 Jan. 2020 When ingested, nepetalactone has a sedative effect. Texas A&m University, Houston Chronicle, "PET TALK: Know the boredom-busting benefits of catnip," 7 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Drug shortages are also leaving some hospitals no choice but to use sedatives linked to delirium. Marion Renault, The Atlantic, "The Pandemic Is a Perfect Storm for ICU Delirium," 5 May 2020 Patients are put to sleep with sedatives and pain relieving medications before a breathing tube is inserted. Caroline Chen, ProPublica, "Ventilators Aren’t Going to Cure COVID-19. Here’s What They Can Do.," 15 Apr. 2020 But health care killers also used sedatives, muscle relaxers, blood thinners, heart drugs and even bleach. Ken Alltucker, USA TODAY, "Nurses who kill: Medical murderers and the mystery of the Clarksburg VA hospital in West Virginia," 18 Oct. 2019 Among the drugs the FDA will allow compounders to make are five sedatives and anesthetics – etomidate, dexmedetomidine, ketamine, lorazepam, and midazolam. Ed Silverman, STAT, "FDA eases rules so compounders can make drugs for Covid-19 patients on ventilators," 16 Apr. 2020 For incidental anxiety related to weather or an event (Fourth of July!), a sedative may be prescribed. Hannah Harper, Health.com, "Have a Stressed Out Pet? Here Are 4 Ways to Help," 15 Apr. 2020 Other people require heavier doses of medications such as narcotics, propofol, benzodiazepines or Precedex (a sedative). Judith Graham, azcentral, "What does recovery from COVID-19 look like? It depends. A pulmonologist explains.," 9 Apr. 2020 The hospital temporarily ran out of protective plastic gowns, of the main sedative for patients on ventilators, of a key blood pressure medication. New York Times, "Coronavirus Live Updates: Trump Warns of ‘a Lot of Death’ and New Virus Hot Spots," 5 Apr. 2020 As noted previously, the decision comes as hospitals are having difficulty receiving orders for more than a dozen sedatives, anesthetics, painkillers, and muscle relaxants, which have been in short supply. Ed Silverman, STAT, "FDA takes another step to ease shortages of drugs for Covid-19 patients on ventilators," 20 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sedative.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sedative

Adjective

1779, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1797, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for sedative

Adjective

Middle English, alleviating pain, from Middle French sedatif, from Medieval Latin sedativus, from Latin sedatus

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Time Traveler for sedative

Time Traveler

The first known use of sedative was in 1779

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Statistics for sedative

Last Updated

22 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Sedative.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sedative. Accessed 3 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for sedative

sedative

noun

English Language Learners Definition of sedative

: a drug that calms or relaxes someone

sedative

noun
sed·​a·​tive | \ ˈse-də-tiv How to pronounce sedative (audio) \

Kids Definition of sedative

: a medicine that calms or relaxes someone

sedative

adjective
sed·​a·​tive | \ ˈsed-ət-iv How to pronounce sedative (audio) \

Medical Definition of sedative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: tending to calm, moderate, or tranquilize nervousness or excitement sedative effects of anesthetics and analgesics— Linda C. Haynes et al

sedative

noun

Medical Definition of sedative (Entry 2 of 2)

: a sedative agent or drug

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Comments on sedative

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