sedative

1 of 2

adjective

sed·​a·​tive ˈse-də-tiv How to pronounce sedative (audio)
: tending to calm, moderate, or tranquilize nervousness or excitement

sedative

2 of 2

noun

: a sedative agent or drug

Examples of sedative in a Sentence

Adjective some people find a glass of wine to be a civilized and sedative addition to an evening meal Noun The patient was given a powerful sedative.
Recent Examples on the Web
Adjective
Roget had spent the previous four years since his graduation taking additional courses and working odd jobs, even volunteering in the spring of 1799 as a test subject at the Pneumatic Institution in Clifton, England, for a trial of the sedative nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas. Claudia Kalb, Smithsonian Magazine, 21 Apr. 2021 Her attorney also listed buspirone (an antianxiety drug), hydroxyzine (an antihistamine that is traditionally used for anxiety or insomina), and Ambien (a sedative-hypnotic). Jessica Bartlett, BostonGlobe.com, 3 Feb. 2023 Kratom alkaloids stimulate the opioid receptors in the brain, producing effects that range from sedative-like and calming to energizing and euphoric. Dallas News, 30 Jan. 2023 The first antipsychotic was designed as a sedative, and so on. Neuroskeptic, Discover Magazine, 26 Apr. 2017 An antagonist that reverses the sedative effects of xylazine, called atipamezole, is used in veterinary medicine. Adrianna Rodriguez, USA TODAY, 24 Jan. 2023 Two police officers, two paramedics and a former police officer pleaded not guilty Friday in the killing of Elijah McClain, 23, a Black man who died after he was placed in a chokehold and given a powerful sedative while in handcuffs. Deon J. Hampton, NBC News, 20 Jan. 2023 Risk factors that would trigger the requirement include taking a high daily dose of an opioid (at least 90 morphine milligram equivalents, or MME); taking certain other drugs, like sedative hypnotics; or having a history of substance use disorder. Michelle Andrews, CBS News, 4 Jan. 2023 Oklahoma uses a three-drug lethal injection method starting with the sedative midazolam, rendering the person unconscious, followed by a paralytic vecuronium bromide and finally potassium chloride, which stops the heart. Steve Smith, CBS News, 12 Jan. 2023
Noun
Detectives determined that Johnson gave the victim a sedative during the incident, police stated in a news release. Landon Mion, Fox News, 10 Apr. 2024 He was pronounced dead at 6:11 p.m. local time at the state prison in Bonne Terre after a single-dose injection of the sedative pentobarbital, said Missouri Department of Corrections spokesperson Karen Pojmann. Dennis Romero, NBC News, 9 Apr. 2024 He was allowed a sedative ahead of being brought into the execution chamber, Tewalt said. Kevin Fixler, Idaho Statesman, 26 Mar. 2024 He is scheduled to be executed using the sedative pentobarbital at 7 p.m. local time, according to the state's Office of the Attorney General. Christopher Cann, USA TODAY, 20 Mar. 2024 Authorities say 59-year-old Willie James Pye was pronounced dead at 11:03 p.m. Wednesday evening following an injection of the sedative pentobarbital. CBS News, 20 Mar. 2024 The three-drug combination involves, firstly, an anesthetic or sedative, then a drug to paralyze the prisoner and, lastly, a drug to stop the heart, the DPIC said. Mary Kekatos, ABC News, 19 Mar. 2024 There is probably also a higher risk with the use of propofol, since the sedative blocks the body’s reflexes for protecting the airway, the authors said. Elaine Chen, STAT, 28 Mar. 2024 In an afternoon update, police said crews had been trying to administer a sedative to the distressed animal, but were unable to reach it due to dangerous water conditions. Sarah Dewberry, CNN, 10 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'sedative.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Adjective

Middle English, alleviating pain, from Middle French sedatif, from Medieval Latin sedativus, from Latin sedatus

First Known Use

Adjective

1779, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1797, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of sedative was in 1779

Dictionary Entries Near sedative

Cite this Entry

“Sedative.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sedative. Accessed 17 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

sedative

1 of 2 adjective
sed·​a·​tive ˈsed-ət-iv How to pronounce sedative (audio)
: tending to calm or to ease tension

sedative

2 of 2 noun
: a sedative medicine

Medical Definition

sedative

1 of 2 adjective
sed·​a·​tive ˈsed-ət-iv How to pronounce sedative (audio)
: tending to calm, moderate, or tranquilize nervousness or excitement
sedative effects of anesthetics and analgesicsLinda C. Haynes et al.

sedative

2 of 2 noun
: a sedative agent or drug

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