scorch

verb (1)
\ ˈskȯrch How to pronounce scorch (audio) \
scorched; scorching; scorches

Definition of scorch

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to burn a surface of so as to change its color and texture
2a : to dry or shrivel with or as if with intense heat : parch
b : to afflict painfully with censure or sarcasm
3 : devastate especially : to destroy (something, such as property of possible use to an advancing enemy) before abandoning used in the phrase scorched earth

intransitive verb

1 : to become scorched
2 : to travel at great and usually excessive speed
3 : to cause intense heat or mental anguish scorching sun scorching fury

scorch

noun

Definition of scorch (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : a result of scorching
2 : a browning of plant tissues usually from disease or heat

scorch

verb (2)
scorched; scorching; scorches

Definition of scorch (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

dialectal British
: cut, slash

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Other Words from scorch

Verb (1)

scorchingly \ ˈskȯr-​chiŋ-​lē How to pronounce scorch (audio) \ adverb

Examples of scorch in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Reduce heat to low and simmer 3 to 4 minutes, being careful not to let the mixture scorch the bottom of the pan. Star Tribune, "Sunday Supper: Peanut Noodle and Pork Satay," 19 Feb. 2021 Halogen bulbs, on the other hand, might scorch your plants' leaves. London Gibson, The Indianapolis Star, "Scrub Hub: What should I do to keep my plants alive during the winter?," 12 Jan. 2021 Bushfires scorch large parts of an Australian island, and residents are concerned about the upcoming season on the mainland. CNN, "CNN 10 - December 3, 2020," 2 Dec. 2020 Such funds are fireballs that can heat up a portfolio—or scorch it. Jason Zweig, WSJ, "When the Stock Market Is Too Much Fun," 11 Dec. 2020 The plant is also fussy about warmth; too much summer heat and the leaves and fruit will scorch. John Tlumacki, The Boston Globe, National Geographic, "Climate change is coming for New England's cranberries," 25 Nov. 2020 The Silverado Fire and Blue Ridge Fire are both burning in Orange County, California, and have quickly grown to scorch nearly 30,000 acres collectively. Amir Vera, CNN, "From soaring Covid-19 cases to a hurricane, here's what's happening this week beyond the election," 28 Oct. 2020 His outsized reputation as an advocate not just willing but eager to scorch earth on behalf of his clients became an advertisement for his services, a phenomenon that continues to this day. Alex Pappademas, Los Angeles Times, "‘He’s our Satan’: Mega music manager Irving Azoff, still feared, still fighting," 5 Nov. 2020 Brusdar Graterol, possessor of perhaps the strongest arm that has ever thrown a pitch for Minnesota, took the mound in the World Series and proceeded to scorch batters with triple-digit heat. Phil Miller, Star Tribune, "Graterol lives up to Twins' World Series dreams -- for the Dodgers," 23 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Napa winemakers are demanding looser restrictions after wildfires, pandemic scorch local tourism. Taylor Kate Brown, SFChronicle.com, "Bay Briefing: Why Sonoma is the only Bay Area county still under tight restrictions," 21 Oct. 2020 Otherwise, its effort to light a fire under HBO Max could leave scorch marks. Dan Gallagher, WSJ, "Wonder Woman’s Riskiest Mission Yet," 19 Dec. 2020 Leaf scorch: Leaf margins will have a brown or burned appearance. oregonlive, "Ask an expert: Tips for deep watering drought-stressed trees," 3 Oct. 2020 There are scorch marks on the pavement where a city truck was burned. Bill Glauber, USA TODAY, "'It's surreal in the worst possible way': Kenosha reels after Jacob Blake shooting and a week of violence," 30 Aug. 2020 Fueled by a fierce and widespread windstorm that started on Labor Day, the fires have spread to scorch close to 1 million acres so far this year -- about double the average annual number for each of the past 10 years. oregonlive, "14-day work weeks and no guaranteed shower: Oregon firefighters endure brutal conditions to save homes and lives," 20 Sep. 2020 There are scorch marks on the pavement where a city truck was burned. Bill Glauber, USA TODAY, "'It's surreal in the worst possible way': Kenosha reels after Jacob Blake shooting and a week of violence," 30 Aug. 2020 Guignardia leaf blotch can be distinguished from environmental scorch by the presence of small, black specks, which are the fruiting bodies of the fungus in the lesions on the leaves. Tim Johnson, chicagotribune.com, "Splotchy, black-specked leaves are likely sign of Guignardia leaf blotch. Here’s how to treat it.," 30 Aug. 2020 There are scorch marks on the pavement where a city truck was burned. Bill Glauber, USA TODAY, "'It's surreal in the worst possible way': Kenosha reels after Jacob Blake shooting and a week of violence," 30 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Bushfires scorch large parts of an Australian island, and residents are concerned about the upcoming season on the mainland. CNN, "CNN 10 - December 3, 2020," 2 Dec. 2020 Halogen bulbs, on the other hand, might scorch your plants' leaves. London Gibson, The Indianapolis Star, "Scrub Hub: What should I do to keep my plants alive during the winter?," 12 Jan. 2021 Such funds are fireballs that can heat up a portfolio—or scorch it. Jason Zweig, WSJ, "When the Stock Market Is Too Much Fun," 11 Dec. 2020 The plant is also fussy about warmth; too much summer heat and the leaves and fruit will scorch. John Tlumacki, The Boston Globe, National Geographic, "Climate change is coming for New England's cranberries," 25 Nov. 2020 His outsized reputation as an advocate not just willing but eager to scorch earth on behalf of his clients became an advertisement for his services, a phenomenon that continues to this day. Alex Pappademas, Los Angeles Times, "‘He’s our Satan’: Mega music manager Irving Azoff, still feared, still fighting," 5 Nov. 2020 The Silverado Fire and Blue Ridge Fire are both burning in Orange County, California, and have quickly grown to scorch nearly 30,000 acres collectively. Amir Vera, CNN, "From soaring Covid-19 cases to a hurricane, here's what's happening this week beyond the election," 28 Oct. 2020 Brusdar Graterol, possessor of perhaps the strongest arm that has ever thrown a pitch for Minnesota, took the mound in the World Series and proceeded to scorch batters with triple-digit heat. Phil Miller, Star Tribune, "Graterol lives up to Twins' World Series dreams -- for the Dodgers," 23 Oct. 2020 Other blazes continue to scorch the west as above-normal temperatures return and gusty winds bring fire concerns for parts of the Great Basin. Fox News, "Bobcat Fire in California becomes one of largest in Los Angeles County history, whips up 'smokenado'," 19 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scorch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scorch

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for scorch

Verb (1)

Middle English; probably akin to Middle English scorcnen to become singed, scorklen to parch

Verb (2)

Middle English, perhaps blend of scoren to score and scocchen to scotch

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Time Traveler for scorch

Time Traveler

The first known use of scorch was in the 14th century

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Statistics for scorch

Last Updated

28 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Scorch.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scorch. Accessed 6 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for scorch

scorch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scorch

: a damaged area or mark that is caused by burning

scorch

verb
\ ˈskȯrch How to pronounce scorch (audio) \
scorched; scorching

Kids Definition of scorch

1 : to burn on the surface The fire scorched the bottom of the pan.
2 : to dry or shrivel with or as if with intense heat Drought scorched the crops.
3 : to produce intense heat The wind had died and already the sun was beginning to scorch.— Theodore Taylor, The Cay

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