scabious

1 of 2

noun

sca·​bi·​ous ˈskā-bē-əs How to pronounce scabious (audio)
ˈska-
: any of a genus (Scabiosa) of Old World herbs of the teasel family with terminal flower heads subtended by a leafy involucre

scabious

2 of 2

adjective

1
: scabby
2
: of, relating to, or resembling scabies
scabious eruptions

Examples of scabious in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Adjective
Flowers included meadow grass, ox-eye daisies, iris, rose, clematis, mock orange, scabious, sweet pea, astrantia, martagon lily and love in a mist. Stephanie Petit, Peoplemag, 7 June 2024 English oak, which symbolizes the strength of love, was there along with scented pelargoniums: garden roses, autumnal hydrangea, sedum, dahlias and scabious in shades of gold, pink and deep burgundy with touches of white to match the flag. Anna Lazarus Caplan, Peoplemag, 19 Sep. 2022 Other elements of the wreath include scented pelargoniums; garden roses; autumnal hydrangea; sedum; dahlias; and scabious, with shades of gold, pink and deep burgundy, as well as touches of white reflecting the Royal Standard on which the wreath sits. Patrick Smith, NBC News, 19 Sep. 2022 India Hobson Deck your table in autumnal reds, with a festive arrangement like this Vervain assemblage of toad lilies, scabious, dahlias, eucalyptus, and hydrangeas in an antique vase. Rachel Silva, ELLE Decor, 9 Dec. 2022 English oak, which symbolizes the strength of love, was there along with scented pelargoniums: garden roses, autumnal hydrangea, sedum, dahlias and scabious in shades of gold, pink and deep burgundy with touches of white to match the Royal Standard. Janine Henni, Peoplemag, 19 Sep. 2022 English oak was also featured to represent the strength of love, while pelargoniums, garden roses, autumnal hydrangea, sedum, dahlias, and scabious were added in shades of gold, pink, deep burgundy, and white to reflect the Royal Standard. Fiona Ward, Glamour, 19 Sep. 2022 There were also garden roses, hydrangea, sedum, dahlias, scabious, and pelargoniums all cut from the gardens at Buckingham Palace, Clarence House, and Highgrove House. Norman Vanamee, Town & Country, 19 Sep. 2022 Late summer stocks and scabious will both be in season, while foliage might include dogwood and skimmia. Tamara Abraham, Harper's BAZAAR, 3 Oct. 2018

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'scabious.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English scabiose, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin scabiosa, from Latin, feminine of scabiosus, adjective

Adjective

Latin scabiosus, from scabies

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1603, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of scabious was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near scabious

Cite this Entry

“Scabious.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scabious. Accessed 18 Jun. 2024.

Medical Definition

scabious

adjective
sca·​bi·​ous ˈskā-bē-əs How to pronounce scabious (audio)
1
: relating to or characterized by scabs
2
: of, relating to, or resembling scabies
scabious eruptions

More from Merriam-Webster on scabious

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!