revoke

1 of 2

verb

re·​voke ri-ˈvōk How to pronounce revoke (audio)
revoked; revoking

transitive verb

1
: to annul by recalling or taking back : rescind
revoke a will
2
: to bring or call back

intransitive verb

: to fail to follow suit when able in a card game in violation of the rules
revoker noun

revoke

2 of 2

noun

: an act or instance of revoking in a card game

Did you know?

Since vocare means "to call" in Latin, to revoke is to "call back". Your driver's license could be revoked after about three convictions for driving under the influence of alcohol; some people's licenses are even revoked for life. You could get your passport revoked if a judge thought you had violated the terms of your bail and suspected you might skip the country. And if you're out of prison on probation and violate the terms of probation, it will probably be revoked and you'll end up back in the slammer.

Examples of revoke in a Sentence

Verb The judge revoked her driver's license. Their work permits were revoked. Their privileges were revoked after they misbehaved.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Add Monsanto’s conviction for bribing a senior Indonesian environmental official to revoke a regulation that was hurting its bottom line. Armstrong Williams, Baltimore Sun, 10 July 2024 Environmental standards Project 2025 calls for the next president to revoke the waiver granted to California, under the federal Clean Air Act, to set its own emission standards for vehicles. Andrew Sheeler, Sacramento Bee, 9 July 2024
Noun
The commission could deny applications, revoke certificates or issue fines in cases of companies that break laws or rules. Jeff Amy, ajc, 7 Feb. 2023 The judge on the case ruled that MSG could for the most part revoke and refuse to sell tickets to the firms, and both the plaintiffs and defendants have appealed. Ethan Millman, Rolling Stone, 21 Dec. 2022 See all Example Sentences for revoke 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'revoke.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French revocer, revoquer, from Latin revocare, from re- + vocare to call, from voc-, vox voice — more at voice

First Known Use

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1709, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of revoke was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near revoke

Cite this Entry

“Revoke.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/revoke. Accessed 18 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

revoke

verb
re·​voke
ri-ˈvōk
revoked; revoking
: to put an end to (as a law, order, or privilege) by taking away or canceling
revoker noun
Etymology

Verb

Middle English revoken "to take back, withdraw," from early French revoquer (same meaning), from Latin revocare "to call back," from re- "back, again" and vocare "to call" — related to advocate, provoke, vocation

Legal Definition

revoke

transitive verb
re·​voke ri-ˈvōk How to pronounce revoke (audio)
revoked; revoking
: to annul by recalling or taking back: as
a
: to destroy the effectiveness of (one's will) by executing another or by an act of destruction (as tearing in half)
b
: to put an end to (a trust)
c
: to withdraw (an offer) especially before acceptance
d
: to withdraw (acceptance of goods) by refusing to keep goods because of nonconformity see also rejection
e
: to take back (as a license or a grant of parole or probation) especially because of misconduct
revoker noun

More from Merriam-Webster on revoke

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!